Here I am, just Uncle Sam and me.
Holding hands in our current poverty.
New York City, Washington DC.
It don't matter, it's all the same to me.
My militia, we ain't on TV.
Staying home, so don't you tread on me.
Mr. Bush, what you gonna do?
Had enough of your red white and blue.

Don't take my rock 'n roll.
Cause it's all I am.
Don't make me sell my soul.
To my Uncle Sam.

Lucifer just came home again.
Fly the flag while sitting unrepaid.
London, England still a curse on me.
Mr. Tony Blair, Uncle Sam and me.
Martin Luther don't come around here no more.
Think he's dead, but I don't know what for.
Maybe freedom, but I don't hear no bells.
Adolf Hitler, he never went to hell.

Don't take my rock 'n roll.
Cause it's all I am.
Don't make me sell my soul.
To my Uncle Sam.

We don't need your tribulation.
We don't need no royal scam.
This is all just masturbation.
Martin, John and Uncle Sam.

Don't take my rock 'n roll.
Cause it's all I am.
Don't make me sell my soul.
To my Uncle Sam.

We don't need your tribulation.
We don't need your royal scam.
This is all just masturbation.
Martin, John and Uncle Sam.
We don't need your tribulation.
We don't need no royal scam.
This is all just masturbation.
Martin, John and Uncle Sam.


Lyrics submitted by slamking

Uncle Sam and Me song meanings
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  • -1
    General CommentSeems to be your basic anti-America song, perhaps with an extremist libertarian mindset to it. Everything seems pretty self-explanatory throughout the song. However one reference (that I couldn't figure out) seems to stick out.

    "We don't need your tribulation.
    We don't need your royal scam.
    This is all just masturbation.
    Martin, John and Uncle Sam."

    I wasn't sure what exactly this was talking about or what was meant by "Martin, John and Uncle Sam." But after a google search I found that that last line is a reference to a folk song from the late 60's by Dion called "Abraham, Martin and John."

    The song is a audio memorial to some American heroes (Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King and John Kennedy). So it's fitting that this pro-America song is belittled by the Moistboyz. Referring to these heroes as the equivalent of a royal family (like the British that once controlled the US).
    hornytheclownon June 06, 2013   Link

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