"I'll Say I'm Sorry Now" as written by and Shawn/leventhal Colvin....
I'm gonna let you down
I know that now
Make you cry, I know I will
Why should you believe
I would never leave
Or that I love you still

For all the by and by
Hard as we try
The bough breaks and the cradle falls
For everything I do
That will tear at you
Let me say I'm sorry now

So you can sing your song
You can get it wrong
You can kiss the rock of ages
And in your wildest dreams
You might see between
The liars and the sages

You can walk awhile
Down the mystery mile
you can beat the drums of freedom
And in love and war
Through the rush and the roar
You just call 'em like you see 'em


Lyrics submitted by 16996602

"I'll Say I'm Sorry Now" as written by Shawn Colvin John Leventhal

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc., Downtown Music Publishing

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I'll Say I'm Sorry Now song meanings
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  • +1
    General CommentThis is a lullaby, but one so honest and bittersweet, it's absolutely lovely in all the right ways. Nearly a perfect song, in my opinion.

    First, I think it's to her child, for a few reasons. "Hard as we try / The bough breaks and the cradle falls" definitely alludes to a baby and cradle. Also, it's clearly a lullaby tune. Pretty clear.

    And the song is about life and what may come for this child. She's telling this baby, let me apologize to you now for all of this stuff that's going to happen to you -- all of the falls, the sadness, the pain and despair -- the life that's just going to happen, good and bad. Every parent knows this is going to happen to their kids, but this song; god, this is the honest truth right here.

    She's saying, you can live your life, and you will. You'll sing your song and you will change your mind a lot ("you can get it wrong"), you might find religion ("kiss the rock of ages"), fall in love (I think "walk a while down the mystery mile"), go to war ("beat the drums of freedom"), and through it all, all this life, "through the rush and roar," you can only be true to yourself, you can only "call 'em like you see 'em." And, I think she's sorry for that too. Sorry that life's not more predictable, that people aren't more trustworthy, that you can't "see between the liars and the sages."

    But, maybe that's just life. I think this song is the most succinct, clear, beautiful explanation of how wonderfully unpredictable and scary life can be, and I think the end just says, well, that's just how it is, just go with it.

    Personally I think it's a little on the pessimistic side, because of course there's so much more to life than the bad stuff. But, learning to go with all of that is part of the process and I think that's what this is about.

    Such a beautiful song, too. A perfect tune to carry this sweet sentiment. One of my all-time favorites, and my 2nd favorite of Colvin's songs (If I Were Brave being #1). It's been a while, glad I remembered it again.
    triswebon August 07, 2008   Link
  • +1
    General Comment"This is a lullaby, but one so honest and bittersweet, it's absolutely lovely in all the right ways. Nearly a perfect song, in my opinion."

    Nearly perfect indeed. My one complaint would just be that its not long enough. Every time i hear it i wish there was at least one more verse. When i first heard it i didn't get the mother/child aspect. I first heard it in the movie Heart breakers which dealt with a breakup between a man/woman. But after reading your post i completely agree with your interpretation. I nearly cried after re-listening to it because i think it really does sum up my feelings toward my child. We wish they would never know pain but we can't protect them forever. All we can hope is that they are content with the choices they make.
    ashley2385on July 26, 2009   Link

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