"Colours" as written by and Odgers Simmonds....
I am a member, of the council, of the naval mutineers;
And no traitor to my conscience having done my sworn duty;
These are my last words, before the scaffold, and I charge you all to hear;
How a wretched, British sailor became a citizen mutineer;
Pressed into service, to carry powder, I was loyal to the crack of the whip;
If I starved on the streets of Bristol, I starved worse on a British ship;

[chorus]
Red is the colour of the new republic
Blue is the colour of the sea
White is the colour of my innocence
Not surrender to your mercy

I was woken, from my misery, by the words of Thomas Paine;
On my barren soil they fell like the sweetest drops of rain;

Red is the colour of the new republic
Blue is the colour of the sea
White is the colour of my innocence
Not surrender to your mercy

So in the spring of the year we took the fleet;
Every cask and cannon and compass sheet;
And we flew a Jacobean flag to give us heart;
While Pitt stood helpless, we were waiting for Bonaparte

Red is the colour of the new republic
Blue is the colour of the sea
White is the colour of my innocence
Not surrender to your mercy

All you soldiers, all you sailors, all you labourers of the land;
All you beggars, all you builders, all you come here to watch me hang;
To the masters we are the rabble, we are the 'swinish multitude';
But we can re-arrange the colours of, the red and the white and the blue;

Red is the colour of the new republic
Blue is the colour of the sea
White is the colour of my innocence
Not surrender to your mercy

Red is the colour of the new republic
Blue is the colour of the sea
White is the colour of my innocence
Not surrender to your mercy


Lyrics submitted by CharmingMan

Colours song meanings
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4 Comments

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  • 0
    General Comment..Another great song from the Waiting for Bonaparte album. This one like the others reflects the world of England around the end of the 18th Century/early 19th Century. Each song illustrates a specific aspect of the time, whether it be child exploitation, advent of steam or sea-faring. This song highlights how young men were "pressed ganged" into the navy and the hard life they had on the ship, which normally ended in death through battle or sickness. Should they leave it ended in being hung as a traitor. How lucky we are today..
    CharmingManon February 26, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentGreat song, and a great definition from CharmingMan, thanks mate
    umpirestrikesbackon April 15, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentEach TMTCH song is a complete story, or a little slice of history, and this is no exception. This is about Bonaparte and Pitt and mutiny, and describes press gangings, these ones in Bristol. Excellent tune too.
    were_walshon May 23, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song is about the Nore mutiny of 1797, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
    It shows the political knowledge and song writing strength the band have. Still a great song 20 years later
    webbieon July 22, 2007   Link

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