"In The Presence Of The Lord" as written by and Eric Patrick Clapton....
I have finally found a way to live
Just like I never could before
I know that I don't have much to give,
But I can open any door

Everybody knows the secret,
Everybody knows the score, yeah yeah yeah
I have finally found a way to live
In the color of the Lord

I have finally found a place to live
Just like I never could before
And I know I don't have much to give,
But soon I'll open any door

Everybody knows the secret,
Everybody knows the score
I have finally found a place to live, oh
In the presence of the Lord
In the presence of the Lord

I have finally found a way to live
Just like I never could before
And I know I don't have much to give,
But I can open any door

Everybody knows the secret,
I said everybody knows the score
I have finally found a way to live, oh
In the color of the Lord
In the color of the Lord


Lyrics submitted by kfe2

"Presence of the Lord" as written by Eric Patrick Clapton

Lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc.

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In The Presence Of The Lord song meanings
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11 Comments

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  • +2
    General CommentThis goes way deeper that simply finding religion. This song is about finding a reason to live through God.
    alexvickerson February 24, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentEric Clapton was rediscovering his Christian roots at this time in his life. This song is about Jesus Christ. "Everybody knows the secret, everybody knows the score"... because sooner or later you must accept the FACT that NOBODY is perfect in this world and we ALL need the Lord. It's a great track, not only because of the beautiful lyrics, but also because Clapton really belts out a screamin' powerful guitar solo as well.
    RayManon February 24, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentActually Eric Clapton wrote this song when he moved into Hurtwood Edge and "found a place to live". This relates to the way people feel about religion. It's not exactly meaning he found religion although you could take it that way if you want to.
    iris_and_a_zephyron November 23, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIt's about finding religion.
    kfe2on February 04, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song is how eric becomes more religous.
    audioslave48195on September 19, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentOr about why to find religion.
    audioslave48195on September 19, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentDespite its religious introspection, truly a Clapton classic. It could be said he never wrote a better song.
    AlkalineTrioFanon February 14, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentSteve Winwood and Eric Clapton are complicated people with complex thoughts and feelings on the ultimate questions of life. The dissonant and ironic chord at the end of "In the Presence of the Lord" demonstrates a reluctance to say "I've found the answer - everybody listen up! - the search is over!" and maybe a bit of frustration that it always has to be that way - an open question. The songs here embrace faith in some sort of ultimate peace while acknowledging that the writers want nothing in the way of dogma. And the final cut "Do What You Like" puts to rest any notion that these guys are getting religion in any conventional sense.

    Someone above said this song was sung by Clapton - Well, it sure sounds like Winwood to me - struggling (beautifully) for those ultra-high notes. If it's Clapton, he's doing his best Winwood impression (actually, no way - I've never heard Eric sing that high.). I'm a fan of both, but Steve wrote three songs for the album, Eric wrote one, and as far as I can tell Winwood sings all the leads. So, despite Clapton's top billing, it's far more a Winwood album. And after this album, Clapton began to use some of the unusual chord changes typical of Winwood's work, such as sliding from the key of D minor down to E-flat minor for the verse in Layla (The song starts with the familiar energetic chorus sequence in D minor.). My favorite example of really unusual changes that work out beautifully is Winwood's "Empty Chair" on one of his solo albums.

    Either way, it's a fantastic collaboration of two giants (and Ginger Baker and Ric Grech were certainly no slouches).
    jaZZjaZZ54on December 19, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentSteve Winwood and Eric Clapton are complicated people with complex thoughts and feelings on the ultimate questions of life. The dissonant and ironic chord at the end of "In the Presence of the Lord" demonstrates a reluctance to say "I've found the answer - everybody listen up! - the search is over!" and maybe a bit of frustration that it always has to be that way - an open question. The songs here embrace faith in some sort of ultimate peace while acknowledging that the writers want nothing in the way of dogma. And the final cut "Do What You Like" puts to rest any notion that these guys are getting religion in any conventional sense.

    Someone above said this song was sung by Clapton - Well, it sure sounds like Winwood to me - struggling (beautifully) for those ultra-high notes. If it's Clapton, he's doing his best Winwood impression (actually, no way - I've never heard Eric sing that high.). I'm a fan of both, but Steve wrote three songs for the album, Eric wrote one, and as far as I can tell Winwood sings all the leads. So, despite Clapton's top billing, it's far more a Winwood album. And after this album, Clapton began to use some of the unusual chord changes typical of Winwood's work, such as sliding from the key of D minor down to E-flat minor for the verse in Layla (The song starts with the familiar energetic chorus sequence in D minor.). My favorite example of really unusual changes that work out beautifully is Winwood's "Empty Chair" on one of his solo albums.

    Either way, it's a fantastic collaboration of two giants (and Ginger Baker and Ric Grech were certainly no slouches).
    jaZZjaZZ54on December 19, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song needs no explanation. Simply beautiful.
    9Kphalakon December 05, 2012   Link

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