"Stand Down Margaret" as written by Andrew Cox, Roger Charlery, Everett Morton, David Steele and David Frederick Wakeling....
I said I see no joy
I see only sorry
I see no chance of your bright new tomorrow

So stand down Margaret
Stand down please
Stand down down down down down
Down down down down down

I say stand down Margaret
Stand down please
Stand down down down down down
Down down down down down

Stand down Margaret
Stand down please
Stand down Margaret

I say stand down Margaret
Stand down please
Stand down down down down down
Down down down down down
Down down down down down
Down down down down down
Down down down down down

[Instrumental]

You tell me how can it work
In this all white law
What a short sharp lesson,
What a third world war

I sometimes wonder
If I'll ever get the chance
Just to sit with my children
In a holiday jam
Our lives seem petty in your cold grey hands
Would you give a second thought
Would you ever give a damn, I doubt it
Stand down Margaret
Awar!
Everybody shout it
Stand down Margaret!

[Instrumental]

Work, white law
Shell shock
World war
War, war, war, war, war
War, war, war, war, war
War, war, war, war, war
War, war, war, war, war
War, war, war, war, war

Stand down please

Stand down Margaret
Stand down please
Stand down Margaret

I say stand down Margaret
Stand down please
Stand down Margaret

Stand down Margaret
Stand down please
Stand down Margaret

I say stand down Margaret
Stand down please
Stand down Margaret


Lyrics submitted by swim_lil_fishie

"Stand Down Margaret" as written by Andrew Cox Roger Charlery

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc.

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Stand Down Margaret song meanings
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6 Comments

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  • +1
    General CommentA song about Margaret Thatcher. Shame it took her 10 years to get the message.
    Bratton February 05, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI doubt anyone involved in writing this song is embarrassed about it! Thatcher's legacy is an embarrassment to the country!
    Bratton May 24, 2007   Link
  • +1
    General Commentthe 70's and 80's were a messed up time in the UK. Then came along Margaret Thatcher- she was a fake. Tried to act all uppity but really wasn't. And she made all of England competive vs neighbors. So stand down Margaret means to resign. It also means to stop acting like a fake and get off your high horse.
    ToadSprocketon April 08, 2012   Link
  • 0
    Link(s)- The song “Stand Down Margaret” was as much about, “get off your soapbox!” as standing down in a political sense. It was: stop showing off to everybody; humble yourself a bit; stop pretending you’re posh -- we know you're from Nottingham.

    In England, there’s a notion called “kippers and curtains,” where somebody buys expensive net curtains to hide the fact that they don't have any furniture at all and they're really inside eating smoked fish twice a day off an old packing case.-

    Says the 80s ska band's guitarist and vocalist: "Most everything about Margaret Thatcher was pretend ... a way for the privileged to secure themselves at the expense of everybody else."

    Guitarist Dave Wakeling was one of the scores of British musicians impacted and angered by Margaret Thatcher's policies in the 1980s. His band, The English Beat, were also among the most vocal, using their ska sound to illustrate the issues of the streets -- a "dispossessed people," as the Birmingham native, now living in Los Angeles, describes even the current state of affairs.

    Indeed, more than two decades since the end of her reign, and in the wake of the former prime minister's death at age 87 on Monday, the wounds are still fresh. Wakeling explains why to The Hollywood Reporter.

    The American perspective of Margaret Thatcher, certainly from a foreign policy point of view, was that she was a trusted ally -- of Ronald Reagan’s in particular -- and did a pretty good job at it. And there's an argument there.

    But what most Americans didn’t see was the complete dismantling of towns and villages, of people's lives being cut short and then cutting their own lives short because they thought, like the Sex Pistols said, that there was no future. That time signaled a breaking of the English spirit, where people who used to have each other's back, and used to talk to strangers -- Thatcher turned neighbors into competitors.

    People misunderstand the socialism of the English after World War II. Soldiers like my father got back to England and there was nothing left -- there were no hospitals, land had been decimated, and that carried through our childhood. So everybody built stuff together and looked after each other. It was like, when push came to shove, although we had differences of opinion, we had each others’ backs.

    Mrs. Thatcher’s introduction of trickle-down economics, and we're still waiting for it to work, broke that mold. She broke the unions. She sold shares of companies that the people already owned, all of which flopped in value. A generation saw their parents give up on life as they saw their own opportunities stunted. They saw the town where they'd grown up dismantled. She was very divisive.

    It was obviously a very transformative time -- similar in some ways to what Americans have gone through in the last few years. A recession closing on depression, a sense of nihilism -- but it reached epic proportions in England where the scapegoats were anybody who seemed to be different … “Your skin color is different? It must be your fault.” To divide people against each other, make them forget in their pain and common suffering, and conquer. Simple. Historic. It’s been done so many times, I don't even know how it works anymore. People go for the bait and get desperate, and if you can reach out with a bit of national pride, you can pump things up with a good war.

    "Some say Margaret Thatcher broke the glass ceiling for women, but she didn’t. Pretending to be an aristocratic man that liked to bully people is not any essence of feminine power. It was just aping the worst of male power."

    Then there was pretense. Something that I think the film Iron Lady missed was, not only how Mrs. Thatcher's accent was terribly affected -- she had a slightly D.H. Lawrence accent from Nottingham East Midlands, or Robin Hood country, and adopted a very proper Oxford English accent -- but her real voice would break out sometimes when she'd get angry. I wish they'd shown that in the film. Because most everything about Mrs. Thatcher was pretend -- it was a way for the privileged to secure themselves at the expense of everybody else, which continues to this day.

    The song “Stand Down Margaret” was as much about, “get off your soapbox!” as standing down in a political sense. It was: stop showing off to everybody; humble yourself a bit; stop pretending you’re posh -- we know you're from Nottingham.

    In England, there’s a notion called “kippers and curtains,” where somebody buys expensive net curtains to hide the fact that they don't have any furniture at all and they're really inside eating smoked fish twice a day off an old packing case.

    hollywoodreporter.com/news/…
    millermotoon April 10, 2013   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI saw them in the 80's and there was lyrics to the effect of:

    "You bring no joy, you bring only sorrow
    Do us a favour and stand down tomorrow."

    Was that just a one-off thing? Or is there another version of the lyrics as well?

    Thank you
    thecrossboneon September 07, 2013   Link
  • -1
    General CommentSongs like these must be sorta embarassing for the musicians who wrote them in retrospect. Anyone wanna imagine what a god awful mess England's economy would be in if labor had had its way back then? Yikes.
    endestewon November 10, 2006   Link

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