"Après Moi" as written by and Regina ...
I (uh) must go on standing
You can't break that which isn't yours
I (uh) must go on standing
I'm not my own, it's not my choice

Be afraid of the lame, they'll inherit your legs
Be afraid of the old, they'll inherit your souls
Be afraid of the cold, they'll inherit your blood
Apres moi le deluge, after me comes the flood

I (uh) must go on standing
You can't break that which isn't yours
I (uh) must go on standing
I'm not my own, it's not my choice

Be afraid of the lame, they'll inherit your legs
Be afraid of the old, they'll inherit your souls
Be afraid of the cold, they'll inherit your blood
Apres moi le deluge, after me comes the flood
Apres moi le deluge, after me comes the flood

Fevrale dostat chernil I plakat
Pisat O Fevrale navsnryd
Poka grohochushaya slyakot
Vesnoyu charnoyu gorit
Vesnoyu charnoyu gorit

Be afraid of the lame, they'll inherit your legs
Be afraid of the old, they'll inherit your souls
Be afraid of the cold, they'll inherit your blood
Apres moi le deluge, after me comes the flood

I (uh) must go on standing
You can't break that which isn't yours
I (are) must go on standing
I'm not my own, it's not my choice

I (uh) must go on stan-stan-ding-dong
You can't, can't break that, that
Which isn't, isn't yours, yours
Which isn't, isn't yours, yours
I'm not, not my own, own
It's not, not my choice, choice


Lyrics submitted by kiwifruit, edited by artkol

"Apres Moi" as written by Regina / Spektor

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

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Après Moi song meanings
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182 Comments

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  • +10
    General Commentthe russian words are a piece of a famouse russian poem by Boris Pasternak. Here is the traslation, but assure you, in Russian it sounds much more beatiful

    February. Get ink, shed tears.
    Write of it, sob your heart out, sing,
    While torrential slush that roars
    Burns in the blackness of the spring.
    ElenaUndonon July 06, 2012   Link
  • +4
    General CommentThis song has a sort of rhythm that reminds me of a revolutionary march. I believe regina may be mocking Russian totalitarian leaders like Stalin or Lenin pretending she was one of them and had their ideals. The lame (the crippled, the paralyzed, the handicapped in whatever way) are bringing down the fit and healthy who are faster, stronger, smarter. The elderly are bringing down the young and their future, the future of the revolution (souls). The "cold" (i believe this could mean the meek, lonely, or even the individualistic) are taking away from the lifeblood and the passionate conformity of the revolution. Boris Pasternak was a poet during the reign of the leaders of the Russian/Soviet revolution and his ideas and criticisms of them sometimes found their way into his poetry. The poem that the Russian lyrics are taken from has somewhat of an apocalyptic or after-the-war feel to it with a pinch of hope like Begin to Hope's subtle theme. Maybe regina is saying, with words taken from Madame de Pompadour (who is said to have had a premonition of the impending political and social collapse that was that lead to the French Revolution), is that though we can change things for the better we can also change things for the worse.
    monkeykillzbananaon February 19, 2007   Link
  • +3
    General CommentIt's actually..

    february. get ink, shed tears.
    write of it, sob your heart out, sing.
    while torrential slush that roars,
    burns in the blackness of the spring.
    feelthewaltzon June 02, 2006   Link
  • +3
    General CommentIs anyone else annoyed when people think every song on this site is about someone wanting to kill themselves?

    Not all music is a call for help...
    Wilhelm Screamon October 03, 2006   Link
  • +3
    General CommentAs far as "I must go on standing/ you can't break that which isn't yours/ I must go on standing/ I'm not my own its not my choice" to me, as a Jew from the same sort of background as Regina, it sounds like a common feeling we have. Our past is our ancestors, and while we're free to make our own choices, we tend to feel near overwhelming guilt over not carrying on traditions that we maybe feel are outdated. We are taught that our lives are not our own. That we live to honor those before us. We live to tell the stories of those who died, and those who survived. To me this song is a very Jewish song. It mirrors my own feelings of ancestory, responsiblity, guilt, expressed individuality, and history. My life is not my own, as it was passed down the line by my mother, who was given it by my grandmother, who was given it by my greatgrandmother, who was given my life through the mercy of G-d who saw it fit that she sould surrvive the camps, the walk from the camps to find home, and any shred of family or neighbor she could. I am to live my life to honor hers. To never take her struggle for granted. Its not my own to live well or live poorly as I please. Living a ruined life is a thankless life. I hear that struggle in Reginas words.
    QuinnaDarlingon August 13, 2009   Link
  • +3
    General CommentPeople mostly stick to the meaning of the Russian part and go deep in search for Pasternak bioghaphy details, historical allusions and so. These researches are nice. But I prefer to concentrate on the form itself.
    Look. The English part is about being strong: "I can't give up, I have no right to surrender, because after me everything will get ruined and those who depend on me will suffer". Then another side breaks through - we can see emotions of protaginist expressed in Russian (which mainly noone understands). This part is full of pain, hopelessness and all-pervading sorrow. But people can't understand this. This is the way to show something hidden from others. Then again comes a burst of self persuadng mantras - I! Must! Go! On!
    So I think this switching from English to Russian and back is the way to compare things on facade (English) and in the backyard (Russian) and the whole song is about torments of a strong personality.
    GangaDevion October 21, 2009   Link
  • +2
    General CommentIt's from a Boris Pasternak poem, if anyone wants to know.

    (He wrote Dr. Zhivago, oh yes he did.)
    kiwifruiton May 02, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentThanks for adding the russian sentences! :D They're really hard to find.
    lemonjuiceon April 15, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI really love this song

    I believe the Russian part translatation is:

    February, pick up your pen and weep,
    Write poems about february in sobs and ink,
    While thunder booming in the background
    Is burning in the black of spring
    ladyfromaboveon May 03, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentThis was written from the perspective of a statue. I think it's about King Louis XV. He was the one who famously said "Apres moi le deluge" which means "after me come the floods." He was hated by the French people and his reign seeded the resentment towards the monarchy that eventually led to the French Revolution.

    "You can't break that which isn't yours." I think she's singing about tradition here.

    "Be afraid of the lame, they'll inherit your legs
    Be afraid of the old, they'll inherit your souls
    Be afraid of the cold, they'll inherit your blood
    Apres moi le deluge, after me come the floods"
    Sounds like a warning against the revolt.

    P.S. Read Boris Pasternak's poem entitled 'February. Take your pen and weep,'.
    naomi6565on June 21, 2006   Link

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