Now that everybody's here
Could we please have your attention?
There is nothing left to fear
No now that bigfoot is captured
But are the children really right
Alright alright

There is danger in the night
There are things we can't control but
Will we give ourselves a fright
When we become less than human?
There are people who say why oh why oh why?
Now there are other ways to die
Oh why oh why?

But upon this tidal wave
Oh god oh god
But upon this tidal wave
Oh god oh god
Young Blood

We are men who stay alive
Who send your children away now
We are calling from a tower
Expressing what must be
Everyone's opinion

They are going out to bars
And they are getting into cars
I have seen them with my own eyes
America please help them

Now they are child stars
Child stars

With the sex and the drugs
And the rock and rock and rock and rock and roll
Hey!




Lyrics submitted by God2005

Upon This Tidal Wave of Young Blood song meanings
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34 Comments

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  • +2
    General CommentIf Sammich's comment was actually arbitrary and not based on some rumor, then it's probably the funniest thing I've read on this website. The review of this song from jamisonlikewhat.com:

    "In the race to call Clap the new band to like/name check/whatever-- behind all the gun-jumping to wait in line for their tickets and find their records and download their early demos and Bogart whatever lo-fi live takes are lying around-- outside all that commotion, I think a lot of people forgot or just never noticed that Clap Your Hands Say Yeah make better music than you or I have ever heard. I promised myself I was going to start talking more trash in these things, but I listen to this song, and their whole record, and every artist who has ever put tone to tempo, and I come to realize that I just like music a lot more than I don’t like music, and that maybe that’s all there is to it.

    'In This Home On Ice' borders on the spiritual, if you just let it in: Congealed, it's a journey less about guitars, bass and drums and more about a sort of sound-as-coalescence amalgam, dulcet elements bursting into a corporate alloy and expanding in all directions. The home that Clap erect is one of singular splendor and majesty, but hey, ice is thin! It breaks, people-- and maybe it even breaks people? Rickety relationships are by no means unusual fare for bands of the indie rock persuasion, but is there more to it than that? Out-of-body, maybe Alec Ounsworth’s nasal tenor is attempting to explore certain depths and heights that you and I have never even dreamt of? 'Hell, I never knew, was what we made it/ Let’s just take it slow in this home on ice,' he vibrates, right before everything falls apart (or, perhaps, into place) and he can’t do anything but repeat himself. 'Hell is what we made it'-- is this not staggering to we as mortals? Does it not buckle floorboards, and humble the soul? Does it not wash away idea and body and spirit and leave only Heaven-knows-what? These days, on this Earth, in this life, where people spend a lot more time trying to be cool than trying to be people, it’s hard to admit to such things. But I will admit, however loud and clear and jubilant and anything, that it does all those things and much, much more, and I don’t care what anyone else has to say about it. This song is perfect."
    jamisonlikewhaton February 27, 2006   Link
  • +2
    General CommentThis song is about the Bush adminstration sending people (young blood) off to war... even though nobody agrees with it... those powers in their tower, making decisions (expressing what must be everyone's opinion), even though they're out of touch with reality... I think the "child stars" ending taps into how young those who are fighting are... in contrast with the old in charge... excellent song, well-written, catchy as all hell, fun...
    smallwonderroboton March 27, 2006   Link
  • +2
    General Commenti think the first part of the song is about kids and how they think they will die from stupid stuff such as "bigfoot", "danger in the night" (boogie monster!),and "less than human" (monster in general) but then it says "Now there are other ways to die" ,someone telling the children thats not how they are going to die



    the seconds part of the song is how the children will die such as bush's administration sending the children off to war
    "This song is about the Bush adminstration sending people (young blood) off to war... even though nobody agrees with it... those powers in their tower, making decisions (expressing what must be everyone's opinion),"
    -smallwonderrobot




    and the last part is about more ways they could die such as "They are going out to bars And they are getting into cars" (drunk driving) or "With the sex and the drugs" (self explanitory)


    i think i summed that up pretty good
    *Modest_ Mouse*on June 03, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General Commentthats silly. ignore the "olsen twins idea" and you have to ignore half the lyrics as well for it to even make sense.

    i love how he always sounds drunk when he's singing
    higginston April 04, 2008   Link
  • +1
    General CommentWhen I listen to this song, I imagine a sort of town hall meeting amongst elder generations that has been gathered to discuss the status of the current youth of America.
    The meeting begins when the spokesperson declares that the people no longer have anything to fear, bigfoot having been captured. A question is raised, however, regarding the youth of society, and a propasal made suggesting that there is something to be feared about the way in which these youths behave
    Next, they discuss what to do about this reckless generation which they cannot understand nor control. One person comes up with a conclusion. First however, he tells the people that they cannot be afraid of making decisions and carrying out actions that may seem inhuman, though some people may disagree.
    The decision made is to send these children to war, thus guaranteeing their own self-preservation. They are "calling from a tower", suggestion superiority, but at the same time carrying the connotation that they are disconnected with the rest of the world, being so high up and seperated from the people below. Their opinion is one which they arrogantly believe is the opinion of all, and is one which no one is allowed to disagree with.
    The youth are described like creatures of folklore who one person attests to have seen, with his own eyes, going out to bars, and getting into cars.
    The repetition of the phrase "they are child stars" purposefully lacks annunciation so that the phrase begins to sound like the word "chastised", which is how these children of a misunderstood generation are treated.
    nowhereman1980on August 06, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe Olsen Twins, right?
    Sammichon December 20, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Commentclap your hands say yeah scares the hell out of me.
    twee!on January 05, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Commentupon this tidal wave of young blood there is some salt, yes, i agree. but carving a (w)hole into our sentence can't undo the savages' realm of hypocrisy (that is, if you concur Vick's smells alright). and of course, it was the Olsen twins -a devoured set of walking sticks- who gave depth to this song. forget it. ... in end, if vanity is a set of earrings, this one wears them well, with a humble face.
    ()on January 29, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentWhat the hell did you just say?
    cowboyupinblueon February 05, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Commentoh it just came about from a satisfaction of a guarantee.

    sheets.

    on the way, doesn't Clap Your Hands Say Yeah have an exclamation point in the end?
    ()on February 20, 2006   Link

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