"Rene and georgette magritte" as written by and Paul Simon....
Rene and Georgette Magritte
With their dog after the war
Returned to their hotel suite
And they unlocked the door
Easily losing their evening clothes
They danced by the light of the moon
To the Penguins, the Moonglows
The Orioles, and The Five Satins
The deep forbidden music
They'd been longing for
Rene and Georgette Magritte
With their dog after the war

Rene and Georgette Magritte
With their dog after the war
Were strolling down Christopher Street
When they stopped in a men's store
With all of the mannequins dressed in the style
That brought tears to their immigrant eyes
Just like The Penguins, the Moonglows
The Orioles, and The Five Satins
The easy stream of laughter
Flowing through the air
Rene and Georgette Magritte
With their dog apres la guerre

Side by side
They fell asleep
Decades gliding by like Indians
Time is cheap
When they wake up they will find
All their personal belongings
Have intertwined
Oh Rene and Georgette Magritte
With their dog after the war
Were dining with the power elite
And they looked in their bedroom drawer
And what do you think
They have hidden away
In the cabinet cold of their hearts?
The Penguins, the Moonglows
The Orioles, and The Five Satins
For now and ever after
As it was before
Rene and Georgette Magritte
With their dog after the war


Lyrics submitted by Farnsworth

"Rene and Georgette Magritte with Their Dog After the War" as written by Paul Simon

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

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Rene and georgette magritte song meanings
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6 Comments

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  • +3
    General CommentThis song is actually inspired by a single photograph. The photo is an old, small, black and white image of surrealist painter Rene Margritte with his wife Georgette and their dog. The caption hand written on the back of the photo reads, "Rene and Georgette Margritte with their dog after the war." If you Google Image Search you can be looking at this obscure and innocuous photo in a matter of seconds. You can also look at the paintings of Rene Margritte, which are exceeded in their strangeness only by that other more-famous surrealist, Salvadore Dali. Why Paul Simon would write this song is anyone's money, and to debate the meaning would be like arguing about the meaning of a Margritte painting. I personally believe Paul Simon is romanticizing the love between two people that survives world wars and poverty....and success.
    moduson February 22, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General Comment
    Very clever song that makes a nice observation about how ideas from the past find their ways into contemporary culture.
    This song and its lyrics are terrific. The song uses the aforementioned photograph which Simon describes. They return to their room and listen to songs by Doo-Wop groups from the 50s and 60s. Rock and Rolld was influenced by surrealists like Rene. Then Rene and Georgette time travel (which would make perfect sense to a surrealist) and end up in New York City strolling down Christopher Street and feel at home because they have helped create the crazy clothing one finds (or found, I haven't been there in a while) there.
    They then travel back home to their own time with their own time and have secret access to the music they helped create.
    Very clever song that makes a nice observation about how ideas from the past find their ways into contemporary culture.
    One line I don't understand (I haven't listened to the song in some time) is "decades gliding by like Indians," unless he's referring to the children's poem, "Ten Little Indians," either way in a lyric about surrealism why should everything make sense?

    RFrancison November 27, 2009   Link
  • +1
    General Comment"gliding by like Indians" refers to the old motor bikes popular in the early 20th century, i'm guessing.
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
    quietorelseon January 01, 2011   Link
  • +1
    My InterpretationNot that I object to surrealist interpretations, but the details of this song are so concrete that I'm looking for a real life interpretation as well. I can't find any evidence for Magritte having lived in New York, so "immigrant" is probably poetic license. However, he did several major exhibitions there and had good friends there, according to visual-arts-cork.com/famous-artists/… (one of several sources I skimmed looking for this).

    They are in a hotel, coming in from a giddy evening with the power elite, losing their clothes, and dancing to the popular music. They're stopping on Christopher Street and looking at the marvels of the New York fashion district. They're just living and being humans together.

    The time travel is the same trip all of us are making. When you're old and in a comfortable groove with your spouse, and you look back, what do you find? The music you danced to. The music you fell in love with together. "For now and ever after, as it was before."
    gementon January 27, 2011   Link
  • 0
    General CommentA very relaxing one!
    bear_hug20on August 18, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentA very relaxing one!
    bear_hug20on August 18, 2007   Link

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