And so it starts, from one impurity held in place by loveless security, thrown around and beaten by squinted eyes that soon bear turned back, abstract views through broken bottles of brandy.

I'm questioned all my life why I kept on saying that I didn't even ask to be here, you made that choice for me, enrolled me in your schools and church and in your god forsaken military.

What cost do I pay for being born of you?
My life, enslaved by passions, and held away from me.
What do I pay?
Who is my mother?
Where is her grace?
Where is that subtle joy I crave?
Who is my mother?
Where is her grace?
Where is that subtle joy I crave?
It's gone (it's gone), or should I say never existed anyway.

Blurry winter clouds and snow melted by anger - my subscription, my addiction (my addiction).

If I had one love in this world.
If I had one love in this world.
If I had one love in this world: you tried to take it away.
If I had one love in this world: you tried to take it away.

A pound of nuts is simply not enough to keep my rage-
A pound of nuts is simply not enough to keep my rage at bay and though I didn't kill you, like you tried to do to me.
I'm just as guilty because I would have wanted to be free.


Lyrics submitted by Inoue versus Date

I Am Dmitri Karamazov and the World Is My Father song meanings
Add your thoughts

8 Comments

sort form View by:
  • +1
    General CommentNo, roadtrippin doesn't pretty much have it down...

    Dmitri Karamazov is one of the three titular brothers in Fyodor Dostoevsky's famous novel "The Brothers Karamazov".

    Dmitri is not the son of Fyodor Dostoevsky, given that Dmitri is a fictional character. The Patriarch, the father of the three brothers is Fyodor Karamazov (see how the last names match up?)

    The "where is my mother" lyrics tie in the fact that Dmitri Karamazov's mother left Fyodor shortly after giving birth to him, and Dmitri was abandoned at around the age of 3 by his father. Therefore the lines reflect the fact that Dmitri never really knew his mother.

    The "broken bottles of brandy" lyric is significant in that one of the novel's chapters is named "Over the Brandy", in which two of the novel's characters debate the existence of God over brandy, hence "abstract views through broken bottles of brandy"

    The lyrics of the song also tie in Dmitri's sensuality (one of his main character traits) - "my life enslaved by passions"

    Most importantly though are the final lyrics - "though I didn't kill you, like you tried to do to me, I'm just as guilty". Though Dmitri did not kill his father in the novel, he is in part guilty, as are the other brothers (in different ways). One of the main themes of the novel is universal guilt, etc.

    Fantastic novel, slightly long though at 800 some pages
    mayneverhaveon January 22, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentAlthough I've never heard this song, i investigated who Dmitri Karamazov was, it seems he's a character from a book. I'm guessing this song is about the book somewhat
    Error: Operatoron March 18, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Commentnot as good as "soft targets make softer graves"
    B12on May 25, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentDmitri Karamazov was a character in a book called The Brothers Karamazov. Dmitri was the oldest son of Fyodor Dostoevsky. Fyodor was also the author of the book. Dmitri was the only son from Fyodor's first wife.

    Who is my mother?
    Where is her grace?

    He hasn't met his mother i guess or she died or something.

    Dmitri spends all his money on beer and women and becomes broke which leads him to become a suspect in a murder trial.

    Dmitri and his father get into a fight over money and the same girl, Grushenka, and the two come very close to killing each other.

    A pound of nuts is simply not enough to keep my rage at bay and though I didn't kill you, like you tried to do to me.
    I'm just as guilty because I would have wanted to be free.


    The Line, "If I had one love in this world: you tried to take it away." Seems to be Dmitri is talking to his dad about Grushenka.

    The line, "What cost do I pay for being born of you?"
    Is showing the hatred he has towards his dad.

    great song
    roadtrippinon May 26, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Commentroadtrippin prettymuch has it down. the book is a craazy complicated, but doestoevsky is an amazing author. i haven't read all of the brothers karamazov yet, but what i have makes sense with this song
    lukehoskinismyheroon October 28, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentAlso,

    The lines concerning the military reflect the fact that Dmitri was a former officer in the Russian army.

    The line - "A pound of nuts is simply not enough to keep my rage at bay" is a reference to a rather obscure story told near the end of the novel about how Dmitri received a pound of nuts from a local doctor was incredibly thankful and grateful for the gift, as no one had ever really given him anything as a child - he was forgotten by his father and raised by his father's servant.


    Basically, the song makes numerous references to the novel, some more obscure than others.
    Kezia owns this though.
    mayneverhaveon February 06, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentHaha, i've just recently finished the Book, and it's awesome.
    I'm russian so, sorry for my language.
    I just wanted to tell how the dude who wrote the lyrix felt the book - he did a pretty great and subtle(hope this is the right word, haha) job!
    Especially these powerful lines
    "My life, enslaved by passions, and held away from me. "
    but i think it can be anyone... Really, ususally people live and don't see anything besides their own selves.
    "A pound of nuts is simply not enough to keep my rage"
    that's a very touching moment in the book, i thing i had tears in my eyes back then :)
    And i hope thanx to this band more people will get to know Fedor Dostoevskiy and one of his greatest books IMHO
    bon3z0ron September 08, 2011   Link
  • 0
    General CommentSomething to add to mayneverhave's post is that the court does find Dmitri to be guilty, which is significant in the context of PTH as adolescents.
    gorgonseyeon January 29, 2014   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain