"La Llorona" as written by Johnette Lin/mankey Napolitano and Willie F/velo Herron....
Todos me dicen el negro, llorona
Negro pero cariñoso
Todos me dicen el negro, llorona
Negro pero cariñoso
Yo soy como el chile verde, llorona
Picante pero sabroso
Yo soy como el chile verde, llorona
Picante pero sabroso

Ay de mí, llorona
Llorona de ayer y hoy
Ay de mí, llorona
Llorona de ayer y hoy
Ayer maravilla fui, llorona
Y ahora ni sombra soy
Ayer maravilla fui, llorona
Y ahora ni sombra soy

Salías del templo un día, llorona
Cuando al pasar yo te vi
Salías del templo un día, llorona
Cuando al pasar yo te vi
Hermoso huipil llevabas, llorona
Que la Virgen te creí
Hermoso huipil llevabas, llorona
Que la Virgen te creí
Ay, de mí, llorona
Llorona de azul celeste
Ay, de mí, llorona
Llorona de azul celeste
Y aunque me cueste la vida, llorona
No dejaré de quererte
Y aunque me cueste la vida, llorona
No dejaré de quererte

Ay


Lyrics submitted by MIsis

"La Llorona" as written by Jairo Zavala Ruiz

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, SADAIC LATIN COPYRIGHTS, INC.

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La Llorona song meanings
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9 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentAll they say the black to me, Weeping
    Affectionate black but
    All they say the black to me, Weeping
    Affectionate black but
    I am like green, Weeping Chile.
    Sharp but flavorful
    I am like green, Weeping Chile.
    Sharp but flavorful
    Ay of me, Weeping Weeping, Weeping, llévame to the river.
    Tápame with your rebozo, Weeping
    Because I die of fried. If because I want you want to you, Weeping
    You want that you are wanted more
    If I have already given the life you, Weeping
    What but you want?
    You want more?
    --- Basic Translation using Alta Vista.

    Amazingly expressive and lovely song.
    MIsison June 08, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think the translation needs improvement. But I'm not attempting it since I can't recall the words "tepame" or "rebozo". Sigh.

    I just wanted to mention that La Llorona is a name, not an emotion or a verb. Llorona refers to a common Mexican story, the weeping woman who drowns her children every night in the river. It's a story, well at least in my family, used to scare children into not going out late at night. For fear that Llorona might get you.

    "Llorona, llévame al río"

    Llorona, take me to the river

    ...there's a lot more to this song. But, it's hard since my translations are pretty rough. :\
    deezleyon February 02, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThey all call me the black one, Weeping Woman,
    The black one but the loving one,
    They all call me the black one, Weeping Woman,
    The Black One but the loving one,
    I am like the green chili plant, Weeping Woman
    Spicy but delicious,
    I am like the green chili plant, Weeping Woman,
    Spicy but delicious,

    You were coming out of the temple one day, Weeping Woman,
    When by passing by you caught my attention,
    You were coming out of the temple one day, Weeping Woman,
    When by passing by you caught my attention,

    Beautiful you were,
    The Virgin I thought I saw,
    You say I have no pain, because you never see me cry,
    There are the dead who do not cry,
    and their sorrow is much greater than mine,

    There by me, Weeping Woman, Weeping Woman, Weeping Woman, Take ME to the river,
    Cover me in you (bosom?) because I am dying of coldness

    Because I love you, you want for me to love you more,
    I have already given you my life, Weeping Woman,
    What else do you want?


    These translated lyrics are roughly done and through the compilation on the two songs on the soundtrack...the song makes an allusion to La Llorrona (Weeping Woman) from the Mexican folk tales...as mentioned by the person who commented prior to me. However, I disagree with the analysis that the song is directly speaking of the Weeping Woman. The singer is telling of a woman who has him trapped because he can no longer love her anymore and he has to be with her because of her constant crying. He tells her, just as the woman who drowned her children because of the lament that she was suffering from her husband leaving her, to take him down to the river and drown him, thus ending his suffering... It's a very morbid song, very it's also extremely poetic...making it absolutely beautiful, esp. when you can understand it in its original tongue.
    thegreatcesar_03on March 07, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI wasn't saying the song was directly referring to La Llarona, I was just explaining the folk lore...
    deezleyon May 07, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis is my little contribution to the comments already submitted.

    Rebozo is a shawl. It is used in many traditional mexican folk dress for women and is used in almost all the women's regional folkloric dresses as part of the outfit. This used to be the way all the women dressed in Mexico, and some still do in certain rural areas, but nowadays, with modern clothes, we often only see these beautiful dresses when there is a Cinco de Mayo or an Independence Day (Sept. 16th) Celebration when they have the folkloric dances.
    Rebozos are used not only for the cold, but also to cover their heads when they go into the church.

    'Tapame' means cover me, therefore...
    'Tapame con tu rebozo' means
    'cover me with your shawl.'
    gabrielaanahion September 17, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthis song is on Frida's soundtrack and it's performed by Chavela Vargas, not Lila Downs
    madameon October 24, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentLila does have a song called 'La Llorona' but these aren't the lyrics. The song by Lila is done with Mariachi Juvenil De Tecalitlan and there are more lyrics to it than just these.
    bloodyaon February 14, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentAll these translations are horrible.

    Just listen to the song in the language its written in and take meaning from that
    chicarittaon May 05, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentTapa me con tu reboso llorona
    Cover me with your "shawl"...llorona
    because I'll die of the cold (weather)

    This song is very long with many verses. It is alomst 300 years old and was once a camp style song. It to me is about a black man who is in love with a Mexican woman...the pain of unrequited love. This is a heartbroken man singing about a beautiful woman he cannot have.
    Not the legendary Llorona who drowned her children in the rio.
    At least thats what I think and feel.
    RioValleyGalon January 24, 2010   Link

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