"Human After All" as written by Thomas Bangalter and Guy Manuel Homem Christo....
We are human after all
Arntcha' comin' after all
We are human after all
Arntcha' comin' after all
We are human after all
Arntcha' comin' after all
We are human after all
Arntcha' comin' after all
We are human after all
Arntcha' comin' after all
We are human after all
Arntcha' comin' after all
We are human after all
Arntcha' comin' after all
We are human after all
Arntcha' comin' after all


Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human after all
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human after all
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human after all
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human after all
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human after all
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human after all
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human, human,
Human, human, human after all


Lyrics submitted by artgoeshere, edited by Solioxrz36, MobiusStrip00, scorpius6p

"Human After All" as written by Thomas Bangalter Guy Manuel Homem Christo

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

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Human After All song meanings
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24 Comments

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  • +3
    General CommentI agree with the irony regarding the robot voice and the phrase "human after all"... but I think the song goes beyond that. It can be divided into a calm, "friendly" part and an agressive one, that begins when the robot keeps repeating "human after all". Taking these two contexts, I think it's possible to have two different interpretations of the phrase: the first, in a gentle tone, as used in a speech for unity between mankind, like "we're all the same, humans"; the second, in a darker and agressive tone, as a justification for a violent, unethical, or maybe repressive action, like "we have our needs, we're human after all". To illustrate this line of thought, if in a video, it's like the first part shows treaties of peace and speeches for partnership between two countries, to bring development, etc, while the real goal is shown in the second part, where weapons are sold from one to another, to fight the common enemy. History is full of events like this, that demonstrate that, behind the scenes, things get dirtier.

    Mullzon November 12, 2009   Link
  • +2
    General Commenti saw them live a couple months ago. it was absolutely the most amazing experience of my life.

    the message of this song hit me when they "played" it: because they flashed all these pictures of people of different ages, races, backgrounds, etc on the triangle/pyramid thing ... everyone's a person, we all have that in common.

    just my take.
    untitledxxon October 07, 2007   Link
  • +1
    General CommentMuch in common, eh?
    img159.imageshack.us/…

    Yeah, no it isn't.

    But, yeah. I think that the meaning of the song has already been covered, and I think it's a really unique song with a good message. :)
    slimshadyon July 07, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentAre you sure it's 'flesh uncovered after all'? I just can't hear that - I hear 'much in common after all'.
    That might not make as much sense as 'flesh uncovered...', but that's what I hear anyways.
    PubliusEnigmaon April 18, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI've listened to this constantly and that small line never caught my attention. Now the song makes more sense. Underneath all that metal theres a human in there.
    Marvel_Man14on May 28, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI reckon, it's refering to the fact Tom and Guy haven't revealed their faces since they've been Daft Punk and are just letting people know that they are humans after all :p
    Quarkboyon September 14, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI love the irony of this song. A robotic/vocoder voice reminding the listener that he is still made of flesh. A simple yet effective song about the dehumanization of society. Brilliant.
    jimmyjango2000on September 28, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentCrap album - yes, Daft Punk prove, that they are human after all.
    bkat004on February 02, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI dont think its a bad album, its just so easy to compare it to Discovery and Homework, which happen to be 2 of the best Left Field House Albums Ever realeased. It's alctually a prett good album, a bit repetitive (even for Daft PUnk) but I'd give it 3.5/5 stars, which by Daft Punks standards, is crap, but otherwise is a pretty good album.

    It just dissapoints people when you know, if they would've spent a month or 2 longer, it would've been another slam dunk classic.

    I always compare Daft Punk to Basement Jaxx. And I say this.

    Basement Jaxx released 3 albums so far from 99-03 and are working on a fourth

    Daft Punk released 3 albums from 97-05

    Remedy:10/10
    Homework:9.5/10 (yes, I am the only person on the planet who doesnt think Homework is a 10)

    Rooty:9/10
    Discovery:10/10

    Kish Kash:8.5/10
    Human After All:7.5/10

    Basement Jaxx Average: 9.1/10 per album
    Daft Punk average: 9/10

    So in theory: Basement Jaxx released slightly better albums on average in roughly half the time that Daft Punk did, therefore, Basement Jaxx has a better body of work, but at there best. Daft Punk blows Basement Jaxx away. (I know, I need a life)
    D4MVPon March 11, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI always though it was "Flesh and blood, after all."
    Poonerpoobon June 04, 2006   Link

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