"Appalatia" as written by Peter Koppes, Steven N Kilbey, Tim Guy Gerard...
Appalatia
You're such a beautiful high
Applicator
A pale blue desire
Cloudy in my memory
Like one long moment can be
Such a godly gift
(You're such a beautiful high)
Turning favor on
Every day I'm watching you
Learning our love song
In this way it's changing you
Fascination, your secrets of life/alive [1:14]
In the ascending, brings on an ultimate smile
Water in the lamplight
Danced along this shared night
Singing with the star shine
Until the morning sun blind
Burning slowly on
Everyday I'm missing you
Yearning not for long
Searching everywhere, I'm gaining you
You're such a beautiful high
Such a beautiful high
Water in the lamplight
Danced along this shared night
Singing with the star shine
Until the morning sun blind
Journey up and on
Every day becoming you
Burning as you lay
(Searching the world)
On this day becoming you
(I'll search beneath the world)
This'll be your shelter
A certain rusty belter
Leave her and I felt her
A river and a delta


Lyrics submitted by childofdune

"Appalatia" as written by Peter Koppes Steven John Kilbey

Lyrics © O/B/O APRA AMCOS, Peermusic Publishing

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Appalatia song meanings
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  • 0
    General CommentI'm surprised nobody has commented on this beautiful song by Koppes! This one, "A New Season," "Transient," and "Reward" really stand out as some of the best Church songs (I also like "Never Before," but not as much as these four). I also feel that this is Koppes' best work so far and a very strong contender for the best song from Forget Yourself.

    I think some of the lyrics are wrongly quoted here, to whit:

    1. I don't hear the "Searching" lines that are parenthesized above; I hear, "You're such a beautiful high," at each place.
    2. The last bit is clearly, "Blissful in our shelter, [summer must've melt her], never have I felt her, a river at a delta."

    Listen to the acoustic version of this song on El Momento Siguiente--he sings these clearly there, although I'm in slight doubt about the line I put in brackets because of the odd grammar.

    This is feasibly a reference to the beautiful mountain range (just gotta see them! I drove them, and this song makes me picture a flight over the Blue Ridge Mountains when the clouds hang around the summits). Partly because of the lyrics, and partly the actual spelling of "Appalatia" (not the proper one, which is, "Appalachia," although this could just be artistic license), I think it's also possibly metaphorically about a woman or female figure. Koppes could be referencing Sophia (Holy Wisdom--I know he's Christian, cuz he said so, and someone at a show told me he's Greek Orthodox), or it could be about a daughter, lover, or even a friend (compare to "Buffalo" and "Tranquility," among others, on this note). Another idea is that this references Native Americans, who were once called Appalachians. Any other thoughts?

    This is also a musically interesting song as played on both Forget Yourself and EMS. There are hints of jazz in the four-chord turnaround (no vocals there, if that helps) and in the bass line Kilbey plays on the album version. I feel that the acoustic version on EMS is too simplified--I'd have liked to hear the band play a more thorough arrangement than just strummed chords and roots for bass; I still like it, nevertheless.
    maddpsyintyston March 05, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI'm surprised nobody has commented on this beautiful song by Koppes! This one, "A New Season," "Transient," and "Reward" really stand out as some of the best Church songs (I also like "Never Before," but not as much as these four). I also feel that this is Koppes' best work so far and a very strong contender for the best song from Forget Yourself.

    I think some of the lyrics are wrongly quoted here, to whit:

    1. I don't hear the "Searching" lines that are parenthesized above; I hear, "You're such a beautiful high," at each place.
    2. The last bit is clearly, "Blissful in our shelter, [summer must've melt her], never have I felt her, a river at a delta."

    Listen to the acoustic version of this song on El Momento Siguiente--he sings these clearly there, although I'm in slight doubt about the line I put in brackets because of the odd grammar.

    This is feasibly a reference to the beautiful mountain range (just gotta see them! I drove them, and this song makes me picture a flight over the Blue Ridge Mountains when the clouds hang around the summits). Partly because of the lyrics, and partly the actual spelling of "Appalatia" (not the proper one, which is, "Appalachia," although this could just be artistic license), I think it's also possibly metaphorically about a woman or female figure. Koppes could be referencing Sophia (Holy Wisdom--I know he's Christian, cuz he said so, and someone at a show told me he's Greek Orthodox), or it could be about a daughter, lover, or even a friend (compare to "Buffalo" and "Tranquility," among others, on this note). Another idea is that this references Native Americans, who were once called Appalachians. Any other thoughts?

    This is also a musically interesting song as played on both Forget Yourself and EMS. There are hints of jazz in the four-chord turnaround (no vocals there, if that helps) and in the bass line Kilbey plays on the album version. I feel that the acoustic version on EMS is too simplified--I'd have liked to hear the band play a more thorough arrangement than just strummed chords and roots for bass; I still like it, nevertheless.
    maddpsyintyston March 05, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentSorry about the double post--browser error!
    maddpsyintyston March 05, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentAgree with your last verse as the song fades out, maddpsyintyst. The posted lyrics are a bit off, and yours seem perfect. Also, COMPLETE & UTTER agreement with your entire first paragraph!!! YES!!!
    terri kayeon April 29, 2010   Link

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