Six filthy children from six absent fathers
And then you turn to us for suckers
Because you think we're just suckers
We may be welfare, oh yeah, but we don't care
And we're paid to despise your council house eyes

Oh, you can change your name and you can bleach your skin
Camouflage your accent so that even you don't recognise it
But you won't escape from the slum mums
Because you are one
Because you even breed like one
And the Labour government can't stand the slum mums
It's engrained underneath your fingernails

The office of the social service is strategically placed
In a dowdy rowdy part of town
To discourage you from signing
We make you feel as if you're whining
When you claim what's legally yours

Oh, you can change your name and you can bleach your skin
Camouflage your accent so that even you don't recognise it
But you won't escape from the slum mums
Because you are one
Because you even breed like one
And the Labour government can't stand the slum mums
It's engrained underneath your fingernails

Take you, and your rat pack brood
To the long grass of the meadow
Administer seven doses - lethal
And illegal which may render you elsewhere


Lyrics submitted by Victor Drazen

The Slum Mums song meanings
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6 Comments

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  • +1
    General Comment"Slum Mums" is a brilliant piece of writing. I love how Morrissey writes in a condescending fashion, attempting to show the inhumanity that many people possess towards those less fortunate. His hopeless words are like a dagger -- no understanding, no love for this Slum Mum. And the effect on the listener is perhaps sorrow for the Slum Mums of the world. Morrissey, of course, isn't that simple though. The near-delight he has while intoning this damnation is so vivid it almost makes one question whether this is a "let's play the bad guy to show the pure-heartedness of the good guy, all the while, subliminally degrading the good guy to truly convey my real feelings" -- a la Bengali in Platforms. While you may not agree with this interpretation, you still must aknowledge Morrissey's brilliance, in painting all these subtle colors and suggestions. The final verse of the song is the most deceptivally impressive part of all. The narrator's encouragement and or/ description of the Slum Mum's infanticide leaves more questions than answers -- is this a case of manchausen syndrome by proxy (i.e. is she crazy?) or is she saving her brood from the indignities of a life in the slums? "Which may render you elsewhere..."
    davidbeauyon February 12, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General Commentknowing Morrissey's hatred for the Tory government...I think he's taking the "bad guy" view in order to help one sympathise with the slum mums.
    Is that heroin at the end?
    enolfon March 04, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentThis song is a polar opposite to many of Morrissey's earlier musings that hint at racism (which he did, not as one himself but rather illustrating the fullfillment of the need in most people to seek refuge from alienation by singling out other "wierdos" - an us vs. them mentality). In direct oppostion to his earlier flirtations with a nihilistic regard for minorities and such - a la Bengali in Platforms -- he now pens a song that mourns the young colored single mother's lot in life - written from the poisonous perspective of a conservative bigot lamenting the audacity this young mother has to recieve any help at all from the state, Morrissey illuminates the very inhumanity of such words and in true Moz fashion culminates the tale with the inevitable Manchausen syndrome by proxy-esque infanticide committed by the despairing mother who thinks her children will be better off - with her - in a place far removed from their glum life.
    davidbeauyon March 27, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentOMG...this song is so goddamn beautiful. Adore it. I think it's about down and out girls?
    enolfon February 02, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song has been on repeat ALL day.
    dontplagiarizeon August 05, 2008   Link
  • 0
    Song MeaningIt is quite clear that Moz is mocking the stupidity and self-loathing of the liberal ideology by setting a perfect trap for them to expose their untenable position. What exactly is redeeming about the Slum Mothers? Answer: Nothing. Yet, he knows that the bleeding heart will fail to admit the wretchedness and guilt of the Slum Mums, many of them not even English, and side against the welfare worker voice of the song, who has had it with those who leach off the taxpayer and contribute to the rot of English society. Perfect Moz.
    DagenhamDonon February 18, 2011   Link

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