"Velvet Green" as written by and Ian Anderson....
Walking on velvet green.
Scots pine growing.
Isn't it rare to be taking the air, singing.
Walking on velvet green.
Walking on velvet green.
Distant cows lowing.
Never a care: with your legs in the air, loving.
Walking on velvet green.

Won't you have my company, yes, take it in your hands.
Go down on velvet green, with a country man.
Who's a young girls fancy and an old maid's dream.
Tell your mother that you walked all night on velvet green.
One dusky half-hour's ride up to the north.
There lies your reputation and all that you're worth.
Where the scent of wild roses turns the milk to cream.
Tell your mother that you walked all night on velvet green.
And the long grass blows in the evening cool.
And August's rare delight may be April's fool.
But think not of that, my love,
I'm tight against the seam.
And I'm growing up to meet you down on velvet green.

Now I may tell you that it's love and not just lust.
And if we live the lie, let's lie in trust.
On golden daffodils, to catch the silver stream
that washes out the wild oat seed on velvet green.
We'll dream as lovers under the stars
of civilizations raging afar.
And the ragged dawn breaks on your battle scars.
As you walk home cold and alone upon velvet green.

Walking on velvet green.
Scots pine growing.
Isn't it rare to be taking the air, singing.
Walking on velvet green.
Walking on velvet green.
Distant cows lowing.
Never a care: with your legs in the air, loving.
Walking on velvet green.


Lyrics submitted by Philadelphia Eagles

"Velvet Green" as written by Ian Anderson

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Velvet Green song meanings
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7 Comments

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  • +1
    General CommentObviously a song about young lust and fertility. Everything abou this song talks about a rendezvous between young lovers in the countryside. Several lines show the lustful aspect in the song. "Never a care, with your legs in the air, loving" obviously refers to a womans legs in the air while making love. "I'm tight against the seam" means that he has an erection. "Washes out the wild oat seed on velvet green" refers to the idea of "sowing one's wild oats", having lots of sex before eventually settling down for marriage. It's purely sex... as the girl has to "walk home cold and alone on velvet green"

    Awesome song by Tull, very folksy and all around great acoustic work.
    Ovichsanon January 31, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentNot difficult to interpret and all comments are broadly correct. But one or two English expressions that I think you might have overlooked. I believe it is August's "ready lass" who may be April's fool (i.e. a girl who is willing to let this man have his way with her). She is also the "poor maid" (not old maid) who has been seduced by the country man who knows that he is attractive and glamorous to girls like her and cyncically lies to them about it being "love and not just lust". They get to the remote spot on a horse - his horse - because it's an hour's ride away, but she ends up walking back. He's gone and she won't see him again ... but he might have left something to remember him by come next April. Some of the sexual imagery is quite crude, but combined with the bucolic setting and the summer twilight it very successfully conveys a lustful atmosphere of youthful sap rising. And as ever with Jethro Tull, especially on this album, you have the impression that the action is set about 200 years ago without it specifically being mentioned. The shame of the pregnancy will therefore be that much more damaging - the "poor maid" is probably living a harsh rural existence and this will not help matters. Clever stuff.
    donutslikefannyson March 05, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI agree with you mainly, but I'm not too sure about the "wild oat seed" part. "The silver stream" sounds like semen, to me. That fits in with the next line, too, apart from the word "oat". Maybe that's just poetic licenese.
    whapcapnon June 04, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Commentbest part:

    August's rare delight may be April's fool.
    airwolf queenon October 03, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Commenti find this music really beautiful.
    bear_hug20on October 20, 2009   Link
  • 0
    My Interpretation"August's rare delight may be April's fool."

    Since it wasn't outright mentioned, I'm assuming this is in reference to the nine-month period, i.e. she my become pregnant from the tryst and bear a child in April (don't know if the fool is her or the child).
    Sironaon February 07, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe musical shifts alternate between joyful and somber. Lyrically the perspective correspondingly shifts from carefree and uninhibited to an examination of the darker, underlying implications around the seduction.
    filterfedon September 28, 2013   Link

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