I've got you,
You've got whatever's left of me to get.
Our conversations are like minefields,
No one's found a safe way through one yet.
I spend a lot of money,
I buy you white gold.
We raise up a little roof,
Against the cold
On Southwood Plantation Road,
Where at night the stars blow like milk across the sky.
Where the high wires drop,
Where the fat crows fly.

All night long you giggle and scream,
Your brown eyes deeper than a dream.
I am not going to lose you,
We are going to stay married.
In this house like a Louisiana graveyard,
Where nothing stays buried.
On Southwood Plantation Road,
Where the dead will walk again.
Put on their Sunday best,
Mingle with unsuspecting Christian men.
La la la la la


Lyrics submitted by weezerific:cutlery

Southwood Plantation Road song meanings
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7 Comments

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  • +1
    General Comment“I’d like to play a song about a couple of extraordinarily miserable people drinking themselves to death in the middle of nowhere down a country road. ‘Country road’ doesn’t mean like what it means on ‘The Waltons.’ It means a gigantic highway, as wide as it is long, it seems, which I think is an impossibility, but it doesn’t feel like it when you’re looking from one side to the next and you make your way down to the house, going, ‘Maybe I’ll go see my old friends and see how they’re doing.’ A horrible idea; you should have called maybe before you made that decision. It’s an expensive, long flight, and they’re drunks. Some people say ‘Woo! They’re drunks!’ No, not woo! Actual drunks, not ‘woo’-worthy. They’re dangerous and they look kind of yellow around the eyes. It’s not really a romantic life they’re leading.” -- JD intro from a recording of a show on June 23, 2011
    embassyrowon December 19, 2012   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI live in Tallahassee Florida, and Southwood Plantation Road is a tucked away little community full of old trailers from the 70s and very old shotgun houses owned by old black families from the 50s. The area is pretty much a district for the impoverished and/or obscure.

    The perfect place for the Alpha couple.
    RedLeafon July 14, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Commenti love the line about minefields. it such a great metaphor.

    this song is basically saying that if this isnt going to save their marriage, nothing will. this is the last hope, and this is looked on optimistically. in fact, the first optimistic song on the album, meaning they're warming up to their new surroundings.
    Cyrus_and_Jeffon July 23, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentOh the irony of the planned 'Southwood' community south of Tallahassee. [ joe.com/web/TownsAndHomes/SouthWood/

    Named after the same plantation, you have to wonder at the similarities behind the picket fences....
    pixifaveon February 24, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe Louisiana graveyard line is a brilliant, brilliant metaphor, and is much better evidence of a stridently creative mind than, for instance, 'our love is like the border between Greece and Albania', clever as the latter line is.
    masterchalkon March 29, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI live in Tallahassee, too. I also live in Southwood (even more so, the road I live on is right off of Southwood Plantation Road). There are no trailers on it, but from the beginning of the road to the end, there's about five or six "impoverished" houses (it's about 2-3 miles long too). Southwood itself is a yuppy community where nearly every house is on top of one another and picked out of a standard designs.
    cold_feverson September 27, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentA comparison using 'like' or 'as' is a simile, not a metaphor. Sorry, but when I see the mistake happen 50 times in the same place I need to speak out...

    Great language anyhow. Very image-inducing.
    imsokoolitsunkoolon March 06, 2011   Link

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