"The Fear" as written by Mick Jones, Joe Strummer, Topper Headon, Paul Simonon, Martyn Ford, Daniel Pugsley, Jeffrey Rose and Clive John Webbe....
Time for talking to, work it all out
Can not the pressure nuff addy youth dem ah shot
Children suffering screams are in vain
An they're dealing with the tormenting again and again
Time for stalling lets work it all out
Some will use the tongue to spit their venom about
Sticks and stones hurt and words they can kill
Harassment and oppression, why can't people just chill
The rude boys are coming so get out of here
Find a place to hide because nuff youth dem ah fear
Stand in ah dem way you know you will disappear
The rude boys are coming and I, I just don't fear
We don't fear rude boy get out of here
With your bully boy tactics you disappear
Don't fear rude gal get out of here
With your bad gal business, disappear
In the play yard the battle is on
And who is going to tell them
That their vibes dem is wrong
Teachers shouting lets sort this out
But when she turns her back
They smack you straight in the mouth
Gunner get you with intimidation
Stand up and be counted cause a counteraction
Turn the tables to know how it feels
You would want them to stop if it was them on your heels
The rude boys are coming so get out of here
Find a place to hide because nuff youth dem ah fear
Stand in ah dem way you know you will disappear
The rude boys are coming and I,
I just don't fear
We don't fear rude boy get out of here
With your bully boy tactics you disappear
Don't fear rude gal get out of here
With your bad gal business, disappear


Lyrics submitted by CIA420

"The Fear" as written by Joe Strummer Mick Jones

Lyrics © Peermusic Publishing, Universal Music Publishing Group, THIRD SIDE MUSIC INC.

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The Fear song meanings
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7 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentAweseome song, Skindred has catchy lyrics and riff happy guitarists. Basically the song is talking about the violence thats going on in our schools, and how our Teachers and Leaders just sit there and watch.
    Remy LeBlueon April 14, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentNot really. Rude boys were originaly gangsters in Jamaica around the time when ska was becoming popular. They often used to operate outside the law, stealing and offering protection for money etc. It was all something to do with the political changes that were going on at the time. Later on, the ska listeners of Jamaica then adopted the gangster style and the Rude Boy name for themselves. I suggest you look it up, 'cause I'm being very vague!

    I suppose in this song he's telling the rude boys to take their underhand mob business elswhere.
    skacore_dudeon December 14, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentSkacore dude, what are you on? This song has nothing to do with that whatsover, listen to Remy.
    In British schools "the play yard" rude boys are the tough kids and often the bullies. This song is about standing up to them and not being intimidated because you know your not gunna get any help from elsewhere.
    You are correct about how the word rude boy was once used but I doubt Skindred would use it in that way.
    Violentpacifiston August 13, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentAwesome song, this song is based on the tune to the Clash's Londons Calling, it has been slowed down and benji decided to right some new lyrics
    ystrdywent2soonon August 22, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentViolentpacifist, listen to skacore. There is good reason to think Skindred would use it this way, as the word is prevalent in ska culture, which is closely related to reggae. The song went2soon is referring to is "Rudie Can't Fail". Check it out.
    Evereston November 30, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI have to agree with Violentpacifist on what this song is about.
    MaverickXon August 12, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Commentystrdywent2soon is right, this song is based on "London Calling" -- not "Rudie Can't Fail", Everest. But yeah, "Rudie Can't Fail" is a good example of the morphing of the term "rude boy". The term is popular enough in ska/reggae circles that Skindred must know the common meaning, even if they were using a slightly different meaning for these lyrics.
    jpers36on March 31, 2009   Link

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