"Quay Cur" as written by and Matthew Friedberger....
I had a locket, a little silver charm,
Given to me so to keep me out of harm.
Canvasing the quayside trying to earn my keep,
A killick tore it off my neck and threw it in the deep.
And now I'll never, never, never feel like I am safe again
And now I'll never, never, never feel like I am safe again
And now I'll never, never, never feel like I am safe again.
Up to the quarentine, late night aboard,
Try to raise our fees but we get what they afford.
Busy work below deck according to form;
Waiting for the clear to leave but then comes up a storm.
We hid beneath the barrels of blubber hoping that the rain had passed
But when the wind kept up the rats cut down the rigging off the mast
And then the rust chewed through the anchor chain and out to sea we're cast.
The clouds dried and cracked
It was calm in fact
The ship had been towed,
By sea Dyaks towed
So we're sold Kolaba
'n sent -- I let out a sob, a
cry oh no it's disaster -- T-Ranter Bay Madacascar.
Great gulps of Greek fire get us in;
Sling sticks at the stockade Fort Dauphin;
A guardsman gave a griffin said grease my duke:
Down by the chimney and out through the fluke.
A looby, a lordant, a lagerhead, lozel,
a lungio lathback made me a proposal:
Straight sail, top mast, astrolabe prospected
down in his dry dock erected infected;
Mocked up with silk strings and taffeta tricked
with nails out of driftwood already iron sicked:
now spy out the glass at whatever missteps me
and the press gang warrant's signed Sir Edward Pepsi.
Course it wasn't long till I caught the croup,
Dawding on the drizzy deck of my majesty's sloop.
If only the hlmsman would turn from his whip staff
With my azimuth compass I'd go by the hectograph
Up to the whaling fleet in Gilbert sound
Then back in the hull when we come around
With 100 seats and 2 polar bears
Nearly in the harbor without any cares,
But then:
A looby, a lordant, a lagerhead, lozel,
a lungio lathback made me a proposal:
Straight sail, top mast, astrolabe prospected
down in his dry dock erected infected;
Mocked up with silk strings and taffeta tricked
with nails out of driftwood already iron sicked:
now spy out the glass at whatever missteps me
and the press gang warrant's signed Sir Edward Pepsi.
Half hour sandglass
Seven saker round shot
Ice for the moonshine
And chichsaneg.
Canyglow, canyglow, canyglow don't say nugo
Tie tight my sugnacoon
In comes the tucktodo
Aba in aob aginyoh.
Look awennye
Get out my sawygmeg
Yliaout, yliaout
Weave us on shore
Unuiche quoysah
Maconmeg
And I gave a sasobneg.
Canyglow, canyglow, canyglow don't say nugo
Tie tight my sugnacoon
In comes the tucktodo
Aba in aob aginyoh.
And now we live by muskles, water weeds with small relief in store
And all the sick men in the Galean were then put upon the shore
And on the 22nd we didn't see our general any more.
Down came our trestle-trees, no pitch tar or nails;
Fore shrouds break no rope we trust;
Only shift of sails.
Drink my Rosa Solis; struck suddenly ahull
Yield ourselves we spoomed, my sinews stiff,
My eyes were dull.
And now I'll never, never, never feel like I am safe again
And now I'll never, never, never feel like I am safe again
And now I'll never, never, never feel like I am safe again.
And as we pass the equinoctial only 5 of us could stand
And while the capsten without sheets or tacks by all of us was manned
And on the 11th day of June ran in at Barehaven to land.


Lyrics submitted by tirhascragoo

"Quay Cur" as written by Matthew Friedberger

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Downtown Music Publishing

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Quay Cur song meanings
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13 Comments

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  • +2
    General CommentThe below is from Clap Clap Blog's translation of the Inuit verse:

    "Half hour sandglass
    Seven saker round shot
    Ice for the moonshine
    And chichsaneg
    Kiss me, kiss me, kiss me, don't say no
    Tie tight my coat
    In comes the fog
    Fallen down in the sea, go fetch
    Look yonder
    Get out my knife
    I mean no harm, I mean no harm
    Weave us on shore
    Give it, give it to me
    Will you have
    And I gave a bracelet
    Kiss me, kiss me, kiss me, don't say no
    Tie tight my coat
    In comes the fog
    Fallen down in the sea, go fetch"

    'Chichsaneg' is the only word that I cannot find anywhere online - my guess is that it is some kind of food or beverage. Also, I am not sure if a 'sasobneg' is strictly defined as being a bracelet. I suspect that it may be a reference to the lost locket from the beginning of the song.

    claps.blogspot.com
    auguruson April 17, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentWhat language do they start using words from at the end, or are they making it up? I can't tell, and if someone knows it'd be really cool if you told me so I didn't have to look it up.
    PittsColt45on April 02, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentWhat's a "killick"?
    CHEESEGODon January 26, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentWow this band is just amazing the girls voice is awesome ahha i likes herr hmm wow i really dont know what this is about sounds like about feelin safe ??
    toitdudeon February 10, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthis song is amazing.
    politik10on June 12, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIm madly in love with this song, its just so much awesomeness compressed into 10 minutes.

    I really have no clue what it could possibly be about though.
    King of Some Islandon December 05, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Commenta killick is a "leading seaman in the British navy" according to worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/….

    "duke" is slang for anal sex (a very likely activity for a sailor)
    airwolf queenon January 21, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIt's about the adventures and misfortunes at seaside they experienced as a result of losing the locket. I like how the song grows faster and then slower like waves in the ocean.
    It uses many words from naval jargon. I wonder if it's based on some written naval adventure or something or if it's completely made up.
    Stroaterson April 17, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentKillick--This word has been around in its literal sense since the sixteenth century. To start with, it usually referred to a rock or big stone that a ship used in lieu of a metal anchor. A fairly modern example is in Jim Davis, by John Masefield: “In the shallow water near the beach, we dropped our killick”.
    crackhousemusicalon August 20, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThat's from worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/… .
    crackhousemusicalon August 20, 2007   Link

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