"Jeane" as written by Johnny Marr and Steven Patrick Morrissey....
Jeane,
The low life has lost its appeal
And I'm tired of walking these streets
To a room with its cupboards bare
Jeane,
I'm not sure what happiness means
But I look in your eyes and I know...
That it isn't there

We tried and we failed
We tried and we failed
We tried and we failed
We tried and we failed
We tried...
Oh Jeane...

There's ice on the sink where we bathe
So how can you call this a home
When you know its a grave
Yet you still have that greedy grace...
As you tidy the place
But it will never be clean...
Jeane

We tried and we failed
We tried and we failed
We tried and we failed
We tried and we failed
We tried...

Gash on the nail
Its just a fairytale...
And I don't believe in magic anymore, Jeane...

But I think you know,
I really think you know
Oh yes I think you know the truth, Jeane

No heavenly choirs not for me
And no not for you
Because I think you know
I really think you know
I think you know the truth
Oh Jeane

We tried and we failed
We tried and we failed
We tried and we failed
We tried and we failed
We tried...


Lyrics submitted by Hang The DJ

"Jeane" as written by Steven Patrick Morrissey Johnny Marr

Lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc., Universal Music Publishing Group

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Jeane song meanings
Add your thoughts

18 Comments

sort form View by:
  • +1
    General CommentThis song may have been inspired by Morrisey's friend Linder, although there are no specific references or allusions to her in either song. A more likely source for this song is Morrissey's aunt, Jeane Sheppard. Also, knowing of Morrisseys interest in Oscar Wilde, it should be noted that the bastard child of Oscar Wilde's friend (and possible lover) Lillie Langtry was named Jeane.
    marquiceriseon January 13, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentQuite correct- it's Morrissey's Aunt who is called Jeane, not his Mother. It's been a while since I last read The Severed Alliance, that's my excuse.
    fourgangeron June 21, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthis song is great. It should be on all the albums. I really dont know why it isnt
    Jemaeuxon July 06, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentA masterpiece, the Sandie Shaw version is possibly the best song ever put to tape.

    Although an early song it is probably Morrissey's best for encapsulating that kitchen-sink-drama he is (or was at the time of the smiths) enthraled with. The whole Shelagh Delaney thing (where he steals many lyrics from)

    Anyhow, i love this song, as jemaeux says it is a well hidden secret.

    The Sandie Shaw version should be downloaded by any music fan, smiths fans who dont own it are being cheated

    xo
    Libertweenon January 25, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe Sandie Shaw version is superior, yes, but this song is beautiful in both versions.
    xdarkentrieson August 28, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe Shaw version is waaay superior. i just figured out the chords on guitar, if anyone's interested let me know.

    I think this song may well be about Morrissey's mother, who was called Jeane, I think the kitchen sink and the reference to cleaning may be allusions to that.
    fourgangeron August 30, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentTo be honest, I prefer the version with Morrissey on vocals. I'm pretty sure it is about his mother - "Yet you still hold a greedy grace as you tidy the place".
    Shadowmelodyon December 18, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentAnybody heard the Billy Bragg version? I'm not as big on the Smiths as I was a while back (Rubber Ring??) but lyrically, it's genius. Every song has a line you can take away and call your own.
    geebeeon December 05, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Commenti absolutely love Sandie Shaw's version. very beautiful song.
    XianSnakeon November 10, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentJeane is almost impossible to get hold of (I think it's going to be on a double-cd compilation released soon), which is a disgrace because for me it is right up with their best work.

    It's just an incredibly powerful song and perfectly sums up the 'mythology' of the Smiths - listening to it you genuinely feel that this was what Morrissey's life was like before the start of the band.

    The last verse ('No heavenly choir/not for me and not for you...') is absolutely sublime, as good if not better than the endings to other Smiths songs like Hand In Glove and I Know It's Over.
    Pleaton September 06, 2008   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain