"Come and Buy My Toys" as written by and David Bowie....
Smiling girls and rosy boys
Come and buy my little toys
Monkeys made of gingerbread
And sugar horses painted red

Rich men's children running past
Their fathers dressed in hose
Golden hair and mud of many acres on their shoes
Gazing eyes and running wild
Past the stocks and over stiles
Kiss the window merry child
But come and buy my toys

You've watched your father plough the fields with a ram's horn
Sowed it wide with peppercorn and furrowed with a bramble thorn
Reaped it with a sharpened scyth, thrashed it with a quill
The miller told your father that he'd work it with the greatest will
Now your watching's over you must play with girls and boys
Leave the parsley on the stalls
Come and buy my toys

You shall own a cambric shirt
You shall work your father's land
But now you shall play in the market square
Till you'll be a man

Smiling girls and rosy boys
Come and buy my little toys
Monkeys made of gingerbread
And sugar horses painted red


Lyrics submitted by saturnine

"Come and Buy My Toys" as written by David Bowie

Lyrics © T.R.O. INC.

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Come and Buy My Toys song meanings
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2 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentThis is like a pedophile or a child-catcher...like Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. I don't know much about this song, but it has great rhythm.
    davidbowiefan1on October 02, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think the song is building up to the third and fourth verses, the first and second describing childhood innocence. The third verse talks about how a child learns the tools of the trade from their father, and the fourth is talking about how eventually childhood innocence ends and the child grows into an adult, taking the place of their father.
    Miloniuson May 22, 2010   Link

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