"Smithers-Jones" as written by and Paul John Weller....
Here we go again, it's Monday at last
He's heading for the Waterloo line
To catch the 8 a.m. fast, it's usually dead on time
Hope it isn't late, got to be there by nine
Pinstripe suit, clean shirt and tie
Stops off at the corner shop, to buy The Times
'Good Morning Smithers-Jones'
'How's the wife and home?'
'Did you get the car you've been looking for?'
'Did you get the car you've been looking for?'

Let me get inside you, let me take control of you
We could have some good times
All this worry will get you down
I'll give you a new meaning to life, I don't think so

Sitting on the train, you're nearly there
You're a part of the production line
You're the same as him, you're like tin-sardines
Get out of the pack, before they peel you back

Arrive at the office, spot on time
The clock on the wall hasn't yet struck nine
'Good Morning Smithers-Jones'
'The boss wants to see you alone'
'I hope it's the promotion you've been looking for'
'I hope it's the promotion you've been looking for'

'Come in Smithers, old boy'
'Take a seat, take the weight off your feet'
'I've some news to tell you'
'There's no longer a position for you'
'Sorry Smithers-Jones'

Put on the kettle and make some tea
It's all a part of feeling groovy
Put on your slippers turn on the TV
It's all a part of feeling groovy
It's time to relax, now you've worked your arse off
But the only one smilin' is the sun-tanned boss
Work and work you wanna work 'till you die
There's plenty more fish in the sea to fry


Lyrics submitted by planetearth

"Smithers-Jones" as written by Bruce Foxton

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Smithers-Jones song meanings
Add your thoughts

7 Comments

sort form View by:
  • +2
    General CommentI was a cabbie back in the 90's and picked up bruce a few times from the train station complete in 'Suit and Tie'. I commented that he looked rather like Smithers Jones himself but he laughed and still gave me a great tip.
    Mojo Workingon September 04, 2006   Link
  • +2
    General CommentIts less about working class being exploited, and more about middle class joe cubicle being dumped on following a "career" and its empty promises. Happy ending though, ole Smithers kicks back and realises he's now free. A lot of the Jam stuff was quite pro the working class (Saturday's kids etc.).
    As apt today as it ever was.
    larryarms1on February 10, 2008   Link
  • +1
    General CommentBruce Foxton wrote this one. It may be about british life, but it sure relates to current American life nowadays. I've been playing this one alot recently, recalling the lyrics from when I was younger and listened to The Jam non-stop.
    LolaBaton November 20, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentYeah man Jam rule I love the wat they placed this right after burning sky on the album so briliant. This song is a great song about being exploited by the upper class and generally being in the working class.
    Cpt-Sensibleon January 02, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI was a cabbie back in the 90's and picked up bruce a few times from the train station complete in 'Suit and Tie'. I commented that he looked rather like Smithers Jones himself but he laughed and still gave me a great tip.
    Mojo Workingon September 04, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentGreat Foxton lyric with a great last verse sang by weller that compliments foxtons tale of exploitation of Mr average by the "suntanned boss"
    sivillaon May 07, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Comment"Let me get inside you, let me take control of you,
    We could have some good times,
    All this worry will get you down,
    I'll give you a new meaning to life - I don't think so."

    what does that part mean?
    trolololoon July 16, 2012   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain