"Dead Disco" as written by and Emily Haines James Shaw....
Skip town. slow down
Push it to the east coast
Step down turn around
Push it to the west
Need less, use less
We're asking for too much I guess
Cause all we get is

Dead disco
Dead funk
Dead rock and roll
Remodel
Everything has been done

Tits out, pants down
Overnight to London
Touch down, look around
Everyone's the same
World wide, air tight
No one's got a face left to blame
And all we get is

Dead disco
Dead funk
Dead rock and roll
Remodel
Everything has been done

Dead disco
Dead funk
Dead rock and roll
Remodel
Everything has been done

I know, I know you tried to change things
I know you tried to change
I know


Lyrics submitted by tine17

"Dead Disco" as written by James Shaw Emily Haines

Lyrics © BMG RIGHTS MANAGEMENT US, LLC

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Dead Disco song meanings
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27 Comments

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  • +1
    General Commenti think this song is about the way no matter how good music is, or how revolutionary (like metric) there's going to be people steretyping and copying... and no matter what we do, people are always going to listen to music for the scene, not the music itself. also, i think in this part: "Tits out, pants down
    Overnight to London
    Touch down, look around
    Everyone’s the same
    World wide, air tight
    No one’s got a face left to blame"
    she's saying that everyone is trying to be someone else's version of COOL, or SCENE and people completely forget who they are.


    yeah...
    Jessy_Rioton February 11, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentThis is one of those songs that have an immediate hook and grow on you, that’s the beauty of pop. The lyrics potentially tap into some disenchantment with the music business and the rate at which we abandon the old (no matter how good) for new. Just listening to it now I can see a second music video with old black and white western style imagery of Bourbon and Beale street musicians keeling over in disgust while the streets flood over with rich fat American tourists wanting to hear a white guy sing some black music.

    There is definitely some inner conflict going on in this song. Where is Emily directing the last line “I know you’re trying to change me”? It can’t be the music business… at least not as long as Celine Dion is busy getting rich horking out the same old shit about love moving mountains it can’t. Emily can sit pretty knowing that the music industry does not want to change her, in fact they would be quite happy with her reissuing the same stuff in a new package every year for an eternity. If a moneymaker aint broken, don’t fix it! So she is talking about her own pressuring need for change right? If this is the case then why does she seem so peeved at the dead disco, funk, and rock scenes we have left behind in our never-ending quest for the ultimate? This is a little dilemma, hers and ours alike.


    The need for fashionable new clichés propel some into a state of no fixed identity where we are constantly grabbing at the next best thing or “flavor of the month” (remember The Cure’s “Jumping someone else’s train”?) when the classic styles of yesteryear can still sell records but not at a rate that satisfies the fattest of cats preying from on top. Maybe some of you remember how fast we jumped off the Guns and Roses train and onto the New Kids on the Block / Vanilla Ice / Marky Mark train and then back on the rockin’ wagon with Nirvana again? You guys are some sick twisted puppies …

    Some are quite content with their style and feel no need to change, but I don’t think this song is about established artists who can afford to churn out the same old formulaic crap and rake in the royalties. It’s about the undiscovered ones trying to bust onto the scene with a catchy new hook for the big fish. So while the music industry feels quite inclined to push the “you must change to survive today” propaganda, Madonna can purchase her rare talents top dollar from music engineers like The Neptunes and we all hail Madonna for her survivor of the ages skills. But she’s a musician right? Not anymore than Dubbya Bush is a good President. She excelled because she hasn’t changed, she’s a business woman always has been, always will, that unfortunately some people have learned to appreciate.

    Historically pop music has not been the place for die hard musicians who are in it for THE MU$IC, so let’s hope Emily still has some fresh tricks up her sleeve, cuz as of now her music kicks some serious ass and I’m anxious for what’s next.
    draven66on April 28, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentThis is the quintessential Metric number, it's about music and musicians. Musicians are trying, but "all we get" is remodeled, old, dead stuff. It's about the hunger for music to be original and about something. Even against something (a face to blame). Musicians go for the look they're supposed to have (pants down, tits out), but they forgot the music. Quite an admonishment.
    elsonidoon March 08, 2011   Link
  • +1
    My OpinionI use this song to illustrate what postmodernism is. They're proclaiming the death of disco, funk and rock and roll in a song that uses disco inspired beats, funk inspired bass and rock and roll inspired guitar. The song itself is a "remodel" of all it says is dead. Beyond that, the statement that "everything has been done" is central to postmodernism. Postmodernism is even reflected in the in music video: they're performing in front of a screen with constantly changing images; it's all surface; everything is just a reproduction of something else. The most postmodern part is that they're complaining about the postmodern condition while simultaneously propagating and indulging in it.

    I know this is academic and pretentious but i've been thinking about it all day.
    CrookedKidon July 23, 2012   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthis song is fuckin amazing live. emily haines loves san fransisco
    samethreewordson April 24, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Commenti wish i coulda seen metric live :(
    foo55on April 29, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI guess this song is about the evolution of music? People think one type of music is "dead" when really it's progressing-- being "remodeled"
    SwedishFishon July 04, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Commentyes this song is amazing live....again, i wish they could've recorded this a little better because after seeing the live performance, the recording sounds very dull. even though it still kicks ass

    and yes, i agree with swedishfish about the meaning...and metric showcases the 'remodeling' in this song, methinks
    tirhascragooon September 28, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Commenti don't like em much. but this song is pretty cool, i'm seeing them tomorrow actually.
    RuthLesson October 07, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Commentjessy! yes!
    i like this song, lyrics are pretty original,
    metric is cool.
    glory_chldon February 20, 2005   Link

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