"Until Morale Improves, the Beatings Will Continue" as written by and Matthew Taylor Armstrong Adam Michael Turla....
I walked the road
From Tucson to San Antonio
With the smell of blood on my breath

Ninety days
Of sweat and dirt
Feels like one night when you've got nothing left

Until there's nothing left to do but die

Buckshot is my bread
I'll drink whiskey instead of water
Because I can't stand to be sober in this place
Your hands on my face
Every step of the way
Trying to peel away the pain

Buckshot is my bread
I'll drink whiskey instead of water
Because I can't stand to be sober in this place
Your hands on my face
Every step of the way
Trying to peel away the pain

I'll drink whiskey instead of water
I'll drink whiskey instead of water
I'll drink whiskey instead of water
I'll drink whiskey instead of water


Lyrics submitted by prayingmantis84, edited by Mellow_Harsher

Until Morale Improves, the Beatings Will Continue song meanings
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  • +1
    General CommentFrom the site:

    "UNTIL MORALE IMPROVES, THE BEATINGS WILL CONTINUE is about the hero of the story, who is returning to the town where he shot the devil in order to finish him off. He is walking across the desert "with blood on his breath" ready to finish what he started. The chorus features the amazing William Elliot Whitmore on backup vocals. He sang to us in the studio through a telephone by the side of the road in Texas, and our producer Dan Goodwin was able to raise the volume enough so you can hear it. The chorus paralels the hero to the Christian act of transubstantiation, where, upon eating and drinking the wafer and wine at mass, they actually become the body and blood of Christ. In his case, "Buckshot is his bread, and he'll drink whiskey instead..." "
    prayingmantis84on May 07, 2004   Link

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