"South Australia" as written by Rupert Christie, Traditional,, Louise Brown, John Brown, Peter Rowen, Julian Brown, Jeremy Brown, Trevor Grills, John Lethbridge, Billy Hawkins, Nigel Sherratt, John Mcdonnell, Johnathan Cleave and Rose Prince....
In South Australia I was born,
Heave away, Haul away!
In South Australia, round Cape Horn,
Bound for South Australia

Haul away, you rollin' king!
Heave away, Haul away!
Haul away, Oh hear me sing!
We're bound for South Australia

Now as I went out one morning fair,
Heave away, Haul away!
'twas there I met Miss Nancy Blair,
Bound for South Australia!

Haul away, you rollin' king!
Heave away, Haul away!
Haul away, Oh hear me sing!
We're bound for South Australia

I shook her up, I shook her down,
Heave away, Haul away!
I shook her up and down the town!
Bound for South Australia!

Haul away, you rollin' king!
Heave away, Haul away!
Haul away, Oh hear me sing!
We're bound for South Australia

There's one thing that does grieve my mind,
Heave away, Haul away!
It's leaving Nancy Blair behind,
We're bound for South Australia

Haul away, you rollin' king!
Heave away, Haul away!
Haul away, Oh hear me sing!
We're bound for South Australia

And as we wallup around Cape Horn,
Heave away, Haul away!
You wish to God you'd never been born!
Bound for South Australia!

Haul away, you rollin' king!
Heave away, Haul away!
Haul away, Oh hear me sing!
We're bound for South Australia

Haul away, you rollin' king!
Heave away, Haul away!
Haul away, Oh hear me sing!
We're bound for South Australia


Lyrics submitted by mulhermujer

"South Australia" as written by James Thirkhill Fearnley Philip Chevron

Lyrics © Peermusic Publishing, Universal Music Publishing Group

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

South Australia song meanings
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2 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentIt's a sailors' sea shanty. I can imagine a dozen men roaring out this song as they fix rigging on an old-time sailing ship. The verse about Cape Horn is in a book by Brian Jaques called "Castaways of the Flying Dutchman". I love the fast harmonica parts!
    Lissaon September 23, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthis is a capstan shanty used by the wool traders who worked the ships between Australian ports and London, England. It's also become known as a farewell song, some of the sailors became so attached to it, they requested it on their death beds.

    Although it's in referenced in the Brian Jacques, the song is much older than Jacques or Gaelic Storm. It's 17th/18th century.
    rhiannoncabaliston October 17, 2007   Link

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