Wow, I'm sick of doubt
Live in the light of certain
South
Cruel bindings
The servants have the power
Dog-men and their mean women
Pulling poor blankets over
Our sailors

I'm sick of dour faces
Staring at me from the TV Tower

I want roses in
My garden bower; dig?
Royal babies, rubies
Must now replace aborted
Strangers in the mud
These mutants, blood-meal
For the plant that's plowed

They are waiting to take us into
The severed garden
Do you know how pale and wanton thrillful
Comes death on a stranger hour
Unannounced, unplanned for
Like a scaring over-friendly guest you've
Brought to bed

Death makes angels of us all
And gives us wings
Where we had shoulders
Smooth as raven's claws

No more money, no more fancy dress
This other Kingdom seems by far the best
Until its other jaw reveals incest
And loose obedience to a vegetable law

I will not go
Prefer a Feast of Friends
To the Giant family


Lyrics submitted by yuri_sucupira

A Feast Of Friends song meanings
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18 Comments

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  • +2
    General CommentI believe the poem is about society/authority (cruel bindings) and the extrinsic negative hierarchical influences it places on us, which eventually leads to the eradication of our individuality. The negative influence that is created feeds on itself, making room for new "plants" to continue the never-ending cycle.

    They are waiting to take us into the severed garden refers to the overwhelming influence society/authority has on us and, what occurs, the death/abolishment of independent thought/individualism. It's unwelcome and may seem unnatural at first, but makes us "normal" conformists, just like everyone else.

    Although we are fooled to think that this life is far the best, we realize that the truth is the opposite. Conformity makes us angels in the eyes of society/authority, but its evil corruption eventually becomes evident.

    Jim is saying that he will not conform, he prefers a feast with other nonconformists than to the "giant family" society/everyone else that has conformed and is no longer a free/independent, open-thinking individual.
    BreakOnThroughon April 16, 2015   Link
  • +1
    General CommentA Feast of Friends to me is obviously about death.
    It refer literaly to death and maybe to the death of the "icon" Jim Morrison.
    In is late life, he retired from the doors and went to Paris.
    Jim decide not to die physicaly now, but retire from the crowd and the crazy life of a rock star.
    The nihilist explanation is also good the me.
    QuebecGuy777on February 19, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General Commentanyone?
    psychobainon October 09, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Commentseems pretty obvious to me..... its called a feast of friends.. hes just saying hed rather stick to a small group of closely knit people than be part of a larger crowd.... hed sacrifice fame for what he stands for, brotherhood.. hes also saying hes sick of fame.... "sick of dour faces staring at me from the tv tower"
    Schr4nzon November 26, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song is an excerpt from Morrison's epic poem "An American Prayer." It was released on the album of the same name.
    As for its meaning, I believe he took the secrets of all his poetry to the grave. His writing is so abstract, so surreal, it's hard to make any sense of it. But I love how he speaks of Death. "A scaring, over-friendly guest you've brought to bed."
    LordDionysiuson June 04, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentNo more money, no more fancy dress
    This other Kingdom seems by far the best
    Until its other jaw reveals incest
    And loose obedience to a vegetable law
    ---death brings an end to all the hardships of life, but also an end to all the great things life has to offer...which goes with the next line

    I will not go
    Prefer a Feast of Friends
    To the Giant family
    ---He wants to live his life with what he has, and the people he holds close rather than spend eternity with the countless others who have died and moved on to the next "kingdom"
    mattduczon May 05, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIf this isn't the most beautiful song about the duality between death and life... Matt ducz got it: He referes to stay alive with his friends than to die a be with a bunch of people he didn'tknow. This was recorded just before he went to Paris, at a time when he was slowing down on his abuses. The damage was done and he died there.
    rkcon December 31, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI'm surprised that many people who claim to be the "biggest" Morrison fans have little to no knowledge about the people and ideologies that influenced his works. This poem is 100% Nietzschean philosophy - - Jim speaks as what Nietzsche referred to as the "Overman". To get a basic understanding (if you're not familiar with Nietzsche's works) read this by cutting and pasting the link into your browser:

    stanford.edu/~pj97/…

    "No more money, no more fancy dress
    This other Kingdom seems by far the best
    Until its other jaw reveals incest
    And loose obedience to a vegetable law"

    In other words, instead of living for this world, we place such a high value on and strive toward the afterlife or "kingdom of god" when in reality (ie, "its other jaw") our religious institutions are corrupt(i.e., "incest") and hypocrytical (i.e., "loose obedience to a vegetable law"). Nietzsche had no use for religion ("God is Dead"). It was this life that concerned him.
    mdmdaon April 18, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentBeatiful,beatiful song...Morrison's lyrics simply rock
    "Prefer a Feast of Friends
    To the Giant family": obviously he's mocking people who believe in heaven and hell and ofcourse religions(epecially
    christianity).It' my favourite line and as for the whole song's meaning,I agree with mdmda,Morrison was really into Nietzche
    eliza13on March 02, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentDid anyone fail to realize that the title of the song is a line from 'When the Music's Over'?
    o.noiron April 30, 2008   Link

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