Two recruiting sergeants came to the CLB,
for the sons of the merchants, to join the Blue Puttees
So all the hands enlisted, five hundred young men
Enlist you Newfoundlanders and come follow me

They crossed the broad Atlantic in the brave Florizel,
And on the sands of Suvla, they entered into hell
And on those bloody beaches, the first of them fell
Enlist you Newfoundlanders and come follow me

And it's over the mountains, and over the sea
Come brave Newfoundlanders and join the Blue Puttees
You'll fight the Hun in Flanders, and at Galipoli
Enlist you Newfoundlanders and come follow me

Then the call came from London, for the last July drive
To the trenches with the regiment, prepare yourselves to die
The roll call next morning, just a handful survived.
Enlist you Newfoundlanders and come follow me

And it's over the mountains, and over the sea
Come brave Newfoundlanders and join the Blue Puttees
You'll fight the Hun in Flanders, and at Galipoli
Enlist you Newfoundlanders and come follow me

The stone men on Water Street still cry for the day
When the pride of the city went marching away
A thousand men slaughtered, to hear the King say
Enlist you Newfoundlanders and come follow me

So it's over the mountains, and over the sea
Come brave Newfoundlanders and join the Blue Puttees
You'll fight the Hun in Flanders, and at Galipoli
Enlist you Newfoundlanders and come follow me

So it's over the mountains, and over the sea
Come brave Newfoundlanders and join the Blue Puttees
You'll fight the Hun in Flanders, and at Galipoli
Enlist you Newfoundlanders and come follow me

Enlist you Newfoundlanders and come follow me


Lyrics submitted by kidlyfe

Recruiting Sargeant song meanings
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2 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentThis is the story of the Blue Puttees, the first Newfoundland division sent into WWI. They were basically mown down with artillery and machine gun when they went "over the top" at the Battle of the Somme. Frontal assaults were generally ineffective and costly in the trench warfare practiced in the Great War, and 733 out of 801 Newfoundlanders did not answer the roll call the next day, making it the hardest hit regiment. This was of course devasting for Newfoundland, and most were regreting the talk of glory that recruiters put forward.
    JilliefromChileon January 14, 2005   Link
  • 0
    Lyric CorrectionLyrics Corrections:

    The second stanza also ends with "Enlist you Newfoundlanders and come follow me"
    The first two choruses begin "And it's over the mountains..." not "So it's over the mountains..."
    Third line of the chorus is "You'll fight the Hun in Flanders," not "You'll fight in Flanders."
    The chorus is only repeated twice at the end of the song, not three times.
    There's an extra repetition "Enlist you Newfoundlanders and come follow me" at the end.
    rampagingpoeton April 09, 2011   Link

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