"Bonny Portmore" as written by and Carsten Heusmann - Dp....
O bonny Portmore, I am sorry to see
Such a woeful destruction of your ornament tree
For it stood on your shore for many's the long day
Till the long boats from Antrim came to float it away.

O bonny Portmore, you shine where you stand
And the more I think on you the more I think long
If I had you now as I had once before
All the lords in Old England would not purchase Portmore.

All the birds in the forest they bitterly weep
Saying, "Where will we shelter or shall we sleep?"
For the Oak and the Ash, they are all cutten down
And the walls of bonny Portmore are all down to the ground.

O bonny Portmore, you shine where you stand
And the more I think on you the more I think long
If I had you now as I had once before
All the Lords of Old England would not purchase Portmore.


Lyrics submitted by TemplarKnight

"Bonny Portmore" as written by Carsten Heusmann - Dp

Lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc.

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Bonny Portmore song meanings
Add your thoughts

4 Comments

sort form View by:
  • 0
    General Commenti love this song, i cried the first time, and every time afterwards that i listened to it, it's truely amazing!!!
    duffon October 03, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI love this song, it is so beautiful. It is about the destruction of the forests in Portmore
    Orion510on April 15, 2006   Link
  • 0
    My OpinionHer voice really gets to you....It's so powerful and passionate...I agree that it's about the forests of Portmore....It's STUNNING <33
    rochey1on March 14, 2011   Link
  • 0
    Song MeaningThe song is about the Great Oak of Portmore, which stood on the shores of Portmore Lough, in Antrim. Portmore "shines where it stands" becauise it is a body of water and thus the light reflects off it and plays on the waves. The Oak, which is known as an Ornament Tree becuse of its large size and age, was toppled in a wind storm in 1760. By that time, the walls of Portmnore Castle had also been dismantled and cast "down to the ground."

    The song, therefore, is a lament for the passing away of many old, and known things; the things that may not have been as highly esteemed when they existed, but which are know understood to be without price. Hence the lines "If I had you now as I had once before/All the lords in Old England would not purchase Portmore."
    EolasPelloron December 01, 2011   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain