"Grantchester Meadows" as written by and Roger Waters....
"Icy wind of nights be gone this is not your domain”
In the sky a bird is heard to cry
Misty morning whisperings and gentle stirring sounds
Belied the deathly silence that lay all around

Hear the lark and harken to the barking of the dog fox
Gone to ground
See the splashing of the kingfisher flashing to the water
And a river of green is sliding unseen beneath the trees
Laughing as it passes through the endless summer, making for the sea

In the lazy water meadow I lay me down
All around me golden sun flakes covering the ground
Basking in the sunshine of a bygone afternoon
Bringing sounds of yesterday into this city room

Hear the lark and harken to the barking of the dog fox
Gone to ground
See the splashing of the kingfisher flashing to the water
And a river of green is sliding unseen beneath the trees
Laughing as it passes through the endless summer, making for the sea


Lyrics submitted by Demau Senae

"Grantchester Meadows [Live BBC Radio Session, 12 May 1969] [Live]" as written by Roger Waters

Lyrics © T.R.O. INC.

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Grantchester Meadows song meanings
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19 Comments

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  • +1
    General CommentThis song is a wonderfull poem and makes me feel summertimehappiness... simply Yeah!
    gigantic_yeahon April 30, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentAbout a minute fifty in (playing it backwards, so a minute fifty from the end forwards), you can hear him say, "save us my savior."

    About four minutes in playing it backwards:
    "here's an offering here for my savior, who saves us in the fall"

    About 4:43 in backwars, "save us my savior" is repeated

    About 5 minutes in backwards, he says, "here's my reward"
    "I am here where the birds go easy early"

    About 5:10 in, he repeats, "here's an offering for my savior, who saves us in the fall"

    About 5:45 in, he says, "my reward is..."

    About 6:07 in, he says, "here my boy finds us in..."

    In case anyone was wondering, I do not think this song is about God or saviors or anything. I think it's about a place from Waters' childhood memories.
    inpraiseoffollyon June 04, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentIts worth paying a visit to Grantchester Meadows if you are ever in Cambridge.

    An idyllic spot for hanging out if you were growing up in Cambridge... Although this is a Roger Waters song, it was David Gilmour who grew up in a house overlooking Grantchester Meadows - at 106 Grantchester Meadows (the street)
    m blankon June 27, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthe lyrics of this song make me think of the lazy days of summer, walking through a park and just enjoying life. this is one of the better tracks off of one of their better and much more eccentric albums, Ummagumma.
    ramtharon July 27, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General CommentMan, I have this VHS of them performing at the Fillmore West for the San Fransisco station KQED. Great freakin' show. Anyhow, when they play this song, Rog and Dave sit down side by side and I swear, its like they have this total Simon and Garfunkel moment. Frekin' incredible.
    ceruleancaterpillaron November 19, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Commenthey caterpillar.... where can i buy that VHS ?
    morningbelon January 02, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Commentmorningbel,

    According to this URL it hasn't been released. Might hafta track down a bootleg of it.

    support.uni-oldenburg.de/~floyd/english/echoes/…
    dcaton December 12, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentAn early Roger Waters ode to his innocent childhood days, before the pressures of adulthood, modern life, and the music business become apparant. Recurring themes he would visit again in other formats. One of the better studio tracks on Ummagumma, performed as "Daybreak" during their "The Man/The Journey" shows in 1969. Solo track features Waters on acoustic guitar with overdubs and nature-themed background tape effects (birdsong, flapping geese, flies buzzing, etc.) Concert performances likewise showcased such effects, enhanced by the Azumith Co-ordinator panpot quadrophonic sound system to throw these enhancements about the audience.

    The KQED performance was one of their best recorded videos from this period, with a nice rendition of this song. The group version split the vocal parts, giving Dave a high register for the 2nd and 4th stanzas, and bringing in a mellow organ fill for a bridge. The best version of the KQED show is the Harvested DVD, with a top quality video capture and a cleanly restored audio track dubbed in from a second source.
    jmkoonson December 15, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentYou can find the KQED performace on Google Video. Just search for pink floyd, KQED. This song is in Part 4/8
    XeroShifton May 05, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis is an absolutely beautiful, nostalgic song. Easily the best off of Ummagumma (a vastly underappreciated album).
    inpraiseoffollyon May 22, 2006   Link

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