"The Holiday Song" as written by and Charles Thompson....
Well sit right down my wicked son And let me tell you a story About the boy who fell from glory And how he was a wicked son This ain't no holiday But it always turn out this way Here I am, with my hand He took his sister from his head And then painted her on the sheets And then rolled her up in grass and trees And they kissed till they were dead This ain't no holiday But it always turns out this way Here I am, with my hand Well sit right down my evil son And let me tell you a story About the boy who fell from glory And how he was a wicked son This ain't no holiday, oh no But it always turns out this way Here I am, with my hand This ain't no holiday But it always turns out this way Here I am, with my hand


Lyrics submitted by numb

"The Holiday Song" as written by Charles Thompson

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

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The Holiday Song song meanings
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  • +3
    General Comment"here i am with my hand"
    listening to the acoustic version, it feels like it could just be being alone with all the things you can do by your own hand, including creative work, as well as "self-abuse".
    McKeanon February 11, 2013   Link
  • +1
    General CommentHoly crap. Why don't we just calm the hell down? It's not good to get so worked up over something so trivial.
    CosmicWolfyon June 17, 2003   Link
  • +1
    General Comment"Sister" doesn't have to mean his actual sister. Some people use sister in the some way "brother" is used. So, "sister" could just mean "girl". Although, knowing what Frank Black's like lyrically, he probably is talking about his sister.

    To me "He took his sister from his head/And then painted her on the sheets/And then rolled her up in grass and trees/And they kissed 'till they were dead" means that he was imagining he was having sex with a girl in a grassy area - maybe a tropical forest? That's what I imagine - until they couldn't continue, and he ejaculated all over his sheets.
    Manchineon February 04, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentRathatespeople, why do you think it is a weak connection?
    Abimelechon July 12, 2009   Link
  • +1
    General Comment"and upended her on the sheets" ?
    Deadcjunkieon July 12, 2009   Link
  • +1
    My InterpretationI just wanted say what I've always thought the song meant (mostly the same as you guys, my only fairly unique opinion is during the "painted her on the sheets" bit).

    "Well sit right down my wicked son
    And let me tell you a story
    About the boy who fell from glory
    And how he was a wicked son"

    Caught masturbating to his sister/pictures of his sister, and his father starts telling him a story about another boy who was sexually attracted to his sister.

    "This ain't no holiday
    But it always turns out this way
    Here I am with my hand"

    I've always seen this from the father's point of view as he's beating the son. But after reading some of the interpretations here, I am not sure. As "But it always turns out this way" does make it sound like it's from the son's PoV, feeling shame as he masturbates to his sister.

    "He took his sister from his head"

    Now I see this as the father continuing his story, and the story boy has gone past just fantasizing about her in his head. He's taken the incest out of his head and into real life.

    "And then painted her on the sheets"

    Always thought of this as a really cool way of saying "and then he threw her on to the bed." Sort of like how some artists will throw paint at a canvas to capture emotion.
    I always think of a top down view of her laying on the bed whenever I hear this bit.

    "and then rolled her up in grass and trees"

    More cool imagery, rolling around in the grass I assume.

    "And they kissed 'till they were dead"

    Someone spots them kissing outside in the grass, and either kills them (angry father/mother/townsfolk) or alerts someone who kills them.

    This is my first time posting here, so I'm really sorry if I did anything wrong.
    Lukanon November 22, 2009   Link
  • +1
    General Commentmy two cents:

    like alot of his songs there is biblical/religious undertones, however i dont think incest is the case. been a pixies fan for a very long time and from what i've read about charles he came from a pretty overzealous religious family (family approved records consisting of Peter Paul and Mary /Larry Norman etc...)

    i think this just him in mid masturbation thinking about the consequences of his sinning. he was told by a preacher or his father or mother or whoever that wicked boys have sex with their 'sisters' (not actual sisters but females) or they perform sexual acts (masturbation) and also are involved with deviant behaviour like smoking marijuana (rolled her up in grass and trees) and ultimately the wages of sin is death "they kissed til they were dead".

    but alas despite all the warnings "here he is with his hand..."

    bottomline just think its a very well written reflection about growing up feeling weird about your sexuality vs your religious upbringing and who knows "this aint know holiday" could refer to a bible camp or something where he is actually performing the masturbation.
    mr.von February 01, 2010   Link
  • +1
    General CommentDefinitely agree the whole thing is about incestuous fantasies, and the guild and frusteration they bring him.
    Surprised I've seen a bit of confusion in the chorus...

    This ain't no holiday
    But it always turns out this way
    Here I am, with my hand

    Here he's saying,
    "this is no rare/special occaision, he always resorts to this-masturbating"
    and his increasing volume and stress just seem to convey the narrator's guilt, shame, and inability to control himself-and the angst it brings him-very well.

    idk how people interpret my hand with getting beaten, idk what they think happens during abuse.
    Sanguiniphrenicon June 10, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General CommentTo me this song is about the inevitability of the character to have strange (wicked/evil) sexual desires. The father represents his coscience, his judging side, and tells him, warns him that this is not the way to go. In the chorus finally the character concludes that he doesn't find these desires to be plesent, but that however, he can't stop them from coming, and accepting them (there he is with his hand). Great song!
    caronte23on July 20, 2011   Link
  • +1
    My InterpretationI have to agree with mr.v about the meaning being a, as mr.v writes, "very well written reflection about growing up feeling weird about your sexuality vs your religious upbringing". I would like to add my thoughts to this.


    Well sit right down my wicked son
    And let me tell you a story
    About the boy who fell from glory
    And how he was a wicked son

    - A father is telling his son about a person acting in a way he doesn't approve of. He doesn't want his son to be like this. He tells his son that he will become worthless if behaves like the boy in the story. Since his son is wicked, his son must have done something similiar to what happens in the story.

    This ain't no holiday
    But it always turns out this way
    Here I am with my hand

    - The father doesn't like to have to have to teach you discipline the hard way. "Here I am with my hand" refers to the father telling his son that he is ready to hit him if he doesn't behave correctly.

    He took his sister from his head
    And then painted her on the sheets

    - Story about some boy who takes his fantasies about a girl (sister meaning female of the same age in general) out of his head and impregnates her, most likely outside of marriage. Something the father wouldn't want to happen with his son.

    And then rolled her up in grass and trees
    And they kissed 'till they were dead

    - Then he rolls a joint, another thing the father doesn't approve of, and smokes it. The death means the joint is finished, his lust for females is satisfied and because he will die in the sense that he becomes worthless / loses his glory.

    This ain't no holiday
    But it always turns out this way
    Here I am, with my hand

    Well sit right down my evil son
    And let me tell you a story
    About the boy who fell from glory
    And how he was a wicked son

    - The father now refers to his son as being evil instead of being wicked. Perhaps because the son defends himself or disagrees with his father.

    This ain't no holiday
    But it always turns out this way
    Here I am, with my hand

    This ain't no holiday
    But it always turns out this way
    Here I am, with my hand

    - The father beats up his son to make him agree with him. The chorus is repeated twice, so the son resists the beatings and the father continous until the son has been silenced. Silenced in a way that he doesn't openly argue his case anymore - but the son is not convinced to follow his fathers ideals.
    justahumbleguyon July 31, 2011   Link

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