Just when I say
'Boy we can't miss
You are golden'
Then you do this
You say this guy is so cool
Snapping his fingers like a fool
One more expensive kiss-off
Who do you think I am

Lord I know you're a special friend
But you don't seem to understand
We got heavy rollers
I think you should know
Try again tomorrow

Can't you see they're laughing at me
Get rid off him
I don't care what you do at home
Would you care to explain

Who is the gaucho amigo,
Why is he standing
In your spangled leather poncho
And your elevator shoes
Bodacious cowboys
Such as your friend
Will never be welcome here
High in the Custerdome

What I tell you
Back down the line
I'll scratch your back,
You can scratch mine
No he can't sleep on the floor,
What do you think I'm yelling for?
I'll drop him near the freeway
Doesn't he have a home

Lord I know you're a special friend
But you refuse to undrestand
You're a nasty schoolboy
With no place to go
Try again tomorrow

Don't tell me he'll wait in the car,
Look at you,
Holding hands with the man from the Rio
Would you care to explain?

Who is the Gaucho amigo,
Why is he standing
In your spangled leather poncho
With the studs that match your eyes
Bodacious cowboys
Such as your friend
Will never be welcome here
High in the Custerdome


Lyrics submitted by AbFab

Gaucho song meanings
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28 Comments

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  • +2
    General CommentMy first time here, but a long-time fan of Steely Dan. My thoughts--the whole Gaucho Album is about Life in Los Angeles/Hollywood and the Entertainment Business. I see Dan as exploring themes in albums--each song playing on the overall theme/idea--the way a novel does with chapters. So to figure this song, I see it as it is, but also in the context of the overall album.

    To me, this has always been fairly obvious song. The narrator is the agent/manager of a high-level(golden) actor or probably athlete (Athlete agent in Glamour Profession--so if the protagonist is the same guy in every song it would be him. An actor wouldn't be so shocking to be bi-sexual as an athlete would, but an athlete wouldn't usually have "elevator shoes" but many actors do.). Either way, the agent knows the client is bi-sexual (special friend), but knows letting it out is good for business, so he's instructed the client to keep things down low. But the client shows up with a flamboyant (obviously gay companion) to some important meeting and the agent is livid because his livelihood depends on what he books for this client (expensive kiss-off). The agent is older, smarter, and has seen it all and knows how to work the system, but the client doesn't get it (don't seem to understand) or is refusing to keep playing the game (refuse to understand). Or more likely, just thinks it's all fun and games and doesn't realize how precarious his existence as a successful actor/athlete is. Think Ari trying to manage Vincent Chase's drug addiction in Entourage.

    Whether the agent is gay or not is interesting. I never thought this because he says, "I know you're a special friend." And he asks, "Who is the gaucho, Amigo?" He's not upset (jealous) that the guy has this flamboyant friend, just that he bought him to the meeting with the agent. The reference to the "spangled leather poncho" "elevator shoes" "bodacious cowboys" and "studs that match your eyes" are all sarcastic quips at the outrageous and totally unacceptable way the guy is dressed and behaving.I always took the phrase as the way the gaucho described the poncho ("see the studs match his eyes") b/c it's a flamboyant thing to say. The agent repeating it sarcastically. I always took it to simply be "WTF? Dude, I'm trying to run a business here." (Can't you see their laughing at me? Get rid of him. I don't care what you do at home.) Not caring what the guy does at home indicates there's no love relationship b/t the agent and client.

    Apparently, the client realizes his error and is looking for what to do with the gaucho--no doubt so he won't be seen with him and is trying to get the agent to hide him or take care of it. But this is crossing the line. (No, he can't sleep on the floor, what do you think I'm yelling for?) This ain't a joke, dude. (I'll drop him near the freeway.) He won't even take him home, but will get him away from here. The lack of respect seems to indicate the agent finds the homo behavior disgusting--esp. since he calls the client a "nasty schoolboy". Saying he has "No place to go" seems to indicate the client can't be seen anywhere with this guy and he's not going to do whatever he does with the guy at the agent's place. "Try again tomorrow" is the agent's resignation to try to book something else for the client the next day--hopefully without the gaucho.

    Finally the agent has convinced the client that the gaucho is f-ing it up for everybody and he will correct his behavior. The agent is still pissed off (Don't tell me he'll wait in the car... Look at you-holding this dude's hand--UGH!) How the hell am I supposed to sell this? Who are you? You're supposed to be the leading man. You're supposed to be the star of the team, etc. This behavior will never sell to the masses--i.e. big leagues, top movies, etc. (Custerdome)--just a generic name for an arena or big venue--Staple's Center, Phillips Arena, Gund Arena.

    That's my 2c.
    JasonsLyricon May 09, 2012   Link
  • +1
    General CommentOk, so somebody I met recently thinks this song is about a gay man and his lover bringing home a Brazilian hunk he met.

    I never thought of it that way until he said that to me. I can see it now, though.

    I never liked this tune until I heard Bob Tedde from The Steely Damned (San Diego) sing it. He claims it's one of his favorites. And he sang it with such reverence and love, you couldn't help but adore the song. It was like a lullaby.
    GreyBlueEyeson August 24, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General Commentya'll just don't understand Steely Dan. This is a love/worried love song from Donald to Walter about Walter's heroin addiction. The gaucho is the drug inside Walter's body. Listen again with that in mind.
    ghouseon September 11, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General CommentA custerdome doesnt refer to George Custer, look the SD Dictionary explains : steelydandictionary.com/ ( scroll down to Custerdome)
    ParisisworthaMasson March 20, 2012   Link
  • 0
    General CommentTo me, it's one hell of a typical Steely Dan songs: obscure lyrical refernces (what the hell's the custerdome:)?), catchy choruses...and Wayne Shorter sitting in on sax, one of the greatest Jazzmen from the classic Blue Note era of the 1960s, doesnt hurt, right?

    As I understand it, a "Gaucho" is a South American (Argentine) cowboy. The narrator seems to be in an odd position: he finds himself dealing with this "gaucho", an intruder in his (male) relationship to his lover. The song is about the narrator's frustration not only with the intruder but also with the newly formed love trianlge that he finds himself trapped in.
    ArtVandelayon August 31, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentRight czahk.... either the protag is embarrassed at his platonic friend parading around with a flaming homosexual, and risking making a scene in front of some 'heavy rollers'.... or he's his lover but wants to keep their gay lifestyle quiet... but the gaucho risks showing it all off in public.

    GREAT song though, regardless of your sexuality. Gaucho is probably THE most underrated Dan album, possibly with the exception of the first.
    rainwalkon March 21, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI have always thought the narrator of the song was a manager talking to his client, an athlete... probably a pro wrestler or rodeo star ( i get this from the spangled leather poncho refernce) ... warning him to keep his homosexuality secret so as not to ruin his budding career (just when I say boy we cant miss, you are golden, now you do this) or offend their sponsors (heavy rollers) I agree, this is a highly underrated album... one of my favorites along with Royal Scam
    cojo727on October 07, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentCojo... I have to tell you I agree with your take on the song 100%. I get the same feeling a manager taking to his "star". This was written while they were in California so I want to say they are taking about a hollywood star, but wrestler or rodeo is possible...it's just that isn't a big money making business with "high rollers"

    This is one of SD's best songs musically. Gaucho is for me the best album they recorded... althought they are all great.
    underbanyantreeson March 01, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentRon1234567 is correcto mundo in his reply to Cojo. It may be taken from the life OF a manager, but the narrator is not the subject's manager, some star-to-be wouldn't be considered like this - "You're a nasty schoolboy
    With no place to go...", if he were star material he'll just find another manager. It's just some skanky loverboy he found on the street and made a deal with, "I'll scratch your back, you can scratch mine", (hint hint). It's The Dan's masterpiece, as far as I'm concerned, but, though they deny it and claim coincidence, it does sound an awful lot like "Long As You Know You're Getting Yours", from Beginnings by master jazz pianist, Keith Jarrett. Jarrett's management sued the stealing Dan, as the courts agreed and now Keith Jarrett is listed as co-writer on this track along with Becker & Fagen. Check out the new CD's in case you haven't seen it.
    rockdrumr429on May 20, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General Commentagreed cojo, never thought of the narrator as a gay lover, more as an agent to his client, who is risking his career with an affair with the gaucho.
    mcsquaredon July 12, 2009   Link

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