Way back when in 'Sixty seven
I was the dandy of Gamm Chi
Sweet things from Boston so young and willing
Moved down to Scarsdale where the hell am I?

Hey Nineteen
No we can't dance together
No we can't talk at all
Please take me along when you slide on down

Hey Nineteen that's 'Retha Franklin
She don't remember the Queen of Soul
It's hard times befallen the sole survivors
She thinks I'm crazy I'm just growing old

Hey Nineteen
No we got nothin' in common
No we can't talk at all
Please take me along when you slide on down

[solo]

ad libbed lines
nice, sure looks good,
hm hm hmm, skate a little lower now

The Cuervo Gold
The fine Columbian
Make tonight a wonderful thing
[say it again]

The Cuervo Gold
The fine Columbian
Make tonight a wonderful thing

The Cuervo Gold
The fine Columbian
Make tonight a wonderful thing

We can't dance together
No we can't talk at all.


Lyrics submitted by AbFab


Hey Nineteen song meanings
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43 Comments

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  • +3
    General CommentThe 'Colombian' they refer to in the song was actually about marijuana, not cocaine, as popularly believed. Back in the 60's/70's most cocaine still came from Peru, while a whole hell of a lot of marijuana came from Colombia. It wasn't until the mid 80's that Colombia became known for it's cocaine, at least in the United States.
    Bustakapon August 25, 2010   Link
  • +2
    General CommentFirst I'd like to say that I can't believe they play this at Walgreens drug stores. I know I'm going out on a limb, this song is about a guy dating a MUCH younger girl. He says she doesn't know any of the stuff he knows from his growing up. They have nothing in common and with that the only thing they can really do is drink hard liquor, do cocaine, and ...what comes after tequila and coke? Great song, slightly disturbing subject.

    Played daily at your neighborhood Walgreens.
    Brokenflowon June 29, 2003   Link
  • +2
    General CommentAretha Franklin and the Soul Survivors were big hits in 1967. It's just a song about the generation gap.
    donutbanditon October 28, 2007   Link
  • +2
    General CommentI think the song's about me and my pathetic midlife.
    kyhangdogon February 29, 2008   Link
  • +2
    General CommentColumbian is not cocaine it is pot. Back in the day it was known as "Lumbo" and was the "good stuff" as opposed to Mexican. Every once in a while Thai Stick would show up, and that stuff was good. Home grown was still off in the future and not widely available.
    Nuhuhon February 25, 2010   Link
  • +2
    General Comment"Dandy of Gamma Chi". The greek letters for Gamma Chi resemble "rx", which of course is the symbol for "prescription" or "pharmacy". Always wondered if he was saying he was the "dandy of drugs" or that he was that guy who always had good stuff on hand.
    bigdc67on July 23, 2012   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI heard this song a million times before I realized what it was about, I doubt a person walking into Walgreens would know what it was about, care, and be offended. I really like the music.
    thatdtctvchppyon April 08, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentUnless they know what the song means.
    magicmanx9on July 22, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General Comment“Skate a little lower now” is the key line. The song is the internal monologue of the protagonist. Out and about, he’s watching “nineteen,” a lovely stranger, and coming to the realization of some hard truths. All men 30 plus began to have these moments.
    panzer4963on April 07, 2008   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI’ve always thought that the “fine Colombian” referred to marijuana, not cocaine. This is back in the days before domestic pot and before “Sinsemilia” or “Green bud” was invented (discovered?). The best pot came out of Colombia (Colombian Gold), and the best cocaine came out of Peru (Peruvian flake) : )

    I also think “Gamma Ki” is a college fraternity, which would put his age at early to mid 20’s. “Nineteen” would be a college freshman ..not illegal, just embarrassing : )

    Peace/JB
    jbecanon July 02, 2008   Link

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