Never was a cornflake girl
thought that was a good solution
hangin with the raisin girls
she's gone to the other side
givin us a yo heave ho
things are getting kind of gross
and I go at sleepy time
this is not really happening
you bet your life it is

Peel out the watchword just peel out the watchword

She knows what's going on
seems we got a cheaper feel now
all the sweeteaze are gone
gone to the other side
with my encyclopedia
they musta paid her a nice price
she's puttin on her string bean love
this is not really happening
you bet your life it is

Rabbit where'd you put the keys girl
and the man with the golden gun
thinks he knows so much
thinks he knows so much
Rabbit where'd you put the keys girl



Lyrics submitted by Novartza


Cornflake Girl song meanings
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103 Comments

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  • +4
    General Comment:"The inspiration for "Cornflake Girl" came from Alice Walker's novel Possessing the Secret of Joy, about a young African woman going through the ritual of female genital cutting. Amos was angered by the idea that a mother could subject her daughter to such a brutal act, and the song arose as an exploration of the idea of betrayal between women. In the song two factions of women are referred to: the "Raisin Girls" are "multicultural" and open-minded, while the "Cornflake Girls" of the title are "narrowminded and full of prejudice".

    The reference to cornflakes and raisins comes from their distribution in a box of breakfast cereal, implying that "raisin girls" are much harder to find than "cornflake girls". Amos has spoken in interviews about being referred to glibly as "the Cornflake Girl" due to the song's title being applied to her, when she considers herself a "Raisin Girl". The mistake may be related to a pre-fame appearance that Amos made in a Kelloggs Just Right commercial in 1987.

    The term "cornflake girl" also appears in the lyrics of the Billy Bragg song "Body of Water" from his 1991 album Don't Try This at Home with the line "Oh, to become a pearl / In the wordy world of the cornflake girl."

    (Taken from wikipedia)
    springhaze29on January 26, 2009   Link
  • +3
    General Comment:"This song describes the irreversible damage and pain rendered by a woman betraying another woman; it's a tragedy, really. Not even their common experiences as females can save what is ruined."


    JupiterMasochiston July 29, 2002   Link
  • +2
    General Comment:i don't know what AriLuvsSondheim is talking about. but it is about the "playground days." how in the hell can you get a rape out if this song? i think they got it confused with "me and a gun." string bean love is fake love, and in a rape, there is no love. so this is not a song about rape. sorrrrrry.
    stickingtosheetson July 21, 2002   Link
  • +2
    General Comment:My take on it was different. I mean, I agree with Jupiter Masochist, because I believe that is a direct Tori quote. However I had it backwards of XmisfitXgirlX's interpretation, as the Corn Flake girls being those flakey rich girls, while the raisin girls were the ones with meaning. Because the not popular girls more often want to be friends with the popular ones. Never is it the other way around, hence "Never was a cornflake girl thought that was a good solution hanging with the raisin girls".. just my .02 cents.
    andshediedon August 31, 2002   Link
  • +2
    Song Meaning:The inspiration for "Cornflake Girl" came from Alice Walker's novel Possessing the Secret of Joy, about a young African woman going through the ritual of female genital mutilation. Amos was angered by the idea that a mother could subject her daughter to such a brutal act, and the song arose as an exploration of the idea of betrayal between women. In the song two factions of women are referred to: the "raisin girls" are "multicultural" and open-minded, while the "cornflake girls" of the title are "narrowminded and full of prejudice".

    The reference to cornflakes and raisins comes from their distribution in a box of breakfast cereal, implying that "raisin girls" are much harder to find than "cornflake girls". Amos has spoken in interviews about being referred to glibly as "the cornflake girl" due to the song's title being applied to her, when she considers herself a "raisin girl". Moreover she specifically states in the first line of the song: "Never was a cornflake girl." (In concerts she has also said "cornflakes" vs. "raisins" was a reference to which girls had ready access to marijuana, Tori herself being bereft of the substance.) The confusion is probably related to her 1987 commercial for Kellogg's Just Right, made before her widespread fame. Just Right includes both raisins and corn flakes, so the song and the cereal are related either through coincidence or intent.

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
    harlemangeon November 26, 2012   Link
  • +1
    General Comment:the first tori song i ever heard....and still one of the best. shes a beautiful performer
    emoprincess1on April 19, 2002   Link
  • +1
    General Comment:i agree with andshedied and jupitermasochist, i see the cornflake girls as the flakey, fake ones, and the raison girls as the ones who have depth to them, and this song basically being about the different types of women and the competition between them. AriLuvsSondheim has very interesting interpretations of songs, the only line in this song that i can relate to rape is the "this is not really happening, (you bet your life it is)".
    silentalltheseyearson September 11, 2002   Link
  • +1
    General Comment:Raisins are JUICY, cornflakes are dry and crusty

    Mvskokeon October 07, 2002   Link
  • +1
    General Comment:I think this is the beauty of Tori Amos. She can make tons of different ppl think tons of different things. Each song means something else to everybody. That's wot makes up a good songwriter. I think this can be anything that was stated here. it's deffinitely about being fake, being something ur not. Wether it's from poor to rich or from popular to unpopular.. is i think for everybody to interpret differently. What's for sure though, this is an AMAZING song
    NoSnobsAllowedon June 15, 2003   Link
  • +1
    General Comment:You know, I read that this song is about the practise of female gential mutlation, or female circumcision.
    Which would explain why this song is described as a "betrayal" & Jupiter Masochist's Tori quote - "This song describes the irreversible damage and pain rendered by a woman betraying another woman; it's a tragedy, really. Not even their common experiences as females can save what is ruined." As it is the women of the village who perform this upon the infant girls.

    And also: "Peel out the watchword just peel out the watchword" could refer to this, & especially "Rabbit where'd you put the keys girl" seems to apply, if you think about it.
    Suzarellaon February 07, 2006   Link

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