"William Butler Yeats Visits Lincoln Park And Escapes Unscathed" as written by and Phil Ochs....
As I went out one evening to take the evening air
F G C F
I was blessed by a blood-red moon
Dm G Am G
In Lincoln Park the dark was turning
I spied a fair young maiden and a flame was in her eyes
And on her face lay the steel blue skies
Of Lincoln Park, the dark was turning
Turning

They spread their sheets upon the ground just like a wandering tribe
And the wise men walked in their Robespierre robes
Through Lincoln Park the dark was turning
The towers trapped and trembling, and the boats were tossed about
When the fog rolled in and the gas rolled out
From Lincoln Park the dark was turning
Turning

Like wild horses freed at last we took the streets of wine
But I searched in vain for she stayed behind
In Lincoln Park the dark was turning
I'll go back to the city where I can be alone
And tell my friend she lies in stone
In Lincoln Park the dark was turning



Lyrics submitted by weezerific:cutlery

"William Butler Yeats Visits Lincoln Park and Escapes Unscathed" as written by

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

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William Butler Yeats Visits Lincoln Park And Escapes Unscathed song meanings
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    General CommentThis is a spooky song set amidst the 1968 Lincoln Park protests in Chicago. It seems to be about a girl the narrator knew who died there, because he first mentions a "fair young maiden" with a "flame in her eyes," and later talks about losing her in the crowd and then planning to tell her that "she lies in stone," which I'm guessing means she's been buried. I'm not sure where William Butler Yeats enters the equation, though. Maybe his ghost visited Lincoln Park and got away with her murder? I doubt it. He's probably just in the title for poetic effect. Unless maybe he's meant to be the ghostly narrator?
    epiwooshon October 08, 2014   Link

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