"Goodbye Horses" as written by and William Garvey....
You told me, I see you rise
But, it always falls
I see you come, I see you go
You say, "All things pass into the night"
And I say, "Oh no sir I must say you're wrong
I must disagree, oh no sir, I must say you're wrong"
Won't you listen to me
You told me, I've seen it all before
Been there, I've seen my hopes and dreams
A lying on the ground
I've seen the sky just begin to fall
And you say, "All things pass into the night"
And I say, "Oh no sir, I must say you're wrong
I must disagree, oh no sir, I must say you're wrong"
Won't you listen to me
Good-bye horses I'm flying over you
Good-bye horses I'm flying over you


Lyrics submitted by shattered_mug, edited by jonerez

"Goodbye Horses" as written by William Garvey

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Goodbye Horses song meanings
Add your thoughts

63 Comments

sort form View by:
  • +9
    Song MeaningThe chorus of this song is a reference to the Hindu text Bhagavad Gita, in which the five horses that pull Krishna and Pandava prince Arjuna's chariot, are symbols of the five senses. These five senses keep us tied to the physical/material plane of existence. When you can transcend the limitations of these senses and achieve a higher level of consciousness, you are leaving the "horses" behind - "flying over them." The song is about someone who was so affected by (A loss? A breakup?) they decide to give up the things that keep them tied to this world by emotion.
    Sathanason September 03, 2012   Link
  • +4
    General CommentI was actually rocking out to this song when they played it in "Silence Of The Lambs" in '91. I became instantly attached to its dark gloominess, and had been searching for "Goodbye Horses" since. To me this song completely personifies the irony of "Dark Dance," a genre so called for its danceable but ultimately tragic / gloomy content. I'm sure many goths or other fans of this genre could recommend other bands or songs that have the same addicting qualities, so I'd appreciate your email if you do. Many people think I'm a freak for liking this song, obviously for its connection to Buffalo Bill and his heinous being. But I say - Oh no sire, I must say you're wrong...

    I actually found a great link that explains the meaning of the song:

    psyche-hq.de/goodbye-horses/

    And for those of you still looking for the song, simply Google "Q Lazzarus Goodbye Horses" ...and you just might find what you're looking for.
    R3roboton January 24, 2005   Link
  • +3
    General CommentAs some have written, "horses" do symbolically represent the five senses. I believe the song describes the desperation that comes with discovering reality for what it truly is; a shattered sense of idealism and an embrace of mortality, and finally the kind of sadness that comes with letting go. The person who "tells them" the truth is a sort wise man that represents what one faces when confronted by stark reality. He says, "All things pass into the night", a phrase that could allude to both death and the ephemeral nature of all things in life. For example, the things you treasured or emotions you felt as a child will pass and you will not remember them; in a way, even in life, you will lose yourself or become disconnected from what you once were. Basically, there is nothing to hold onto and the singer must accept letting go. The singer's first reaction is "I must disagree... won't you listen to me?"; a desperate plea that loss is not inevitable as the singer attempts to hold on to innocence. Next the other individual says that they have "seen there hopes and dreams lying on the ground", and beyond that "seen the sky just begin to fall", which is a more apocalyptic vision of the loss of everything (one's life, one's entire sense of reality and self, etc...). In the end, the singer accepts this, and "goodbye horses" represents a kind of enlightenment, sort of discovering of what lies beyond the senses, which is a deeper and much more harsh truth. However, this is not a happy enlightenment. In desperation the singer recognizes mortality, loss, and the total uncertainty of reality. The singer is flying over the kind of grounded sense of life and self previously held, and has moved onto an entirely new, but much scarier and insecure sense of reality. This makes me think of a kind of tortured spirit or whirling through the air. So in affect the song is a huge nervous breakdown caused by the loss of innocence.
    zepkid5678on February 21, 2007   Link
  • +2
    General Commentput the lotion in the basket.
    khaledoniaon June 22, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI love this song, it's so awsome. It must have some deep meaning, but I don't feel like figuring it out. It seems very psychadelic. Maybe it's sort of about someone who feels enlightened, like they know the absolute truth.
    MistyMadnesson January 02, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentQ Lazzarus is a woman? Didn't see that one coming. Well, here's what that website had to say.

    In an Eastern philosophy "horses" are symbolic/representative of the 5 senses - the things that keep us tied to the physical/material plane of existence. When you can transcend the limitations of these senses and achieve a higher level of consciousness, you are leaving the "horses" behind - "flying over them." The song is about someone who was so affected by (A loss? A breakup?) they decide to give up the things that keep them tied to this world by emotion.

    That's fucked. I love it.
    FaaipDeOaidon May 30, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI loved this song in GTA IV! I purposely turned any radio station to the classics just for this song in that game.
    classicsfanon January 12, 2009   Link
  • +1
    Song FactI was once explicitly spoken to by a guru that this songs true title is "Goodbye Horace." Horace held the position of military tribune under Brutus, one of the chief assassins of Julius Caesar, and fought on the side of the Tyrannicides at the battle of Philippi in 42 B.C.E. But enough of the history lesson, I know what your really thinking, "How big was Horace's hog?" Romans were fond of a larger penis, their art on the walls of formerly ash-buried cities depict men and gods with larger penises than average so it's a perfectly valid question asshole. Sorry. The guru, whose name I think was Conscription "Mars Bars" Philomena the 3rd, told me this story all while complaining about a "Soccer moms" parking job he witnessed the day before. He got pretty worked up about it, even going as far as to describe what her whore children's fate will be if his God makes its long awaited return to network television. I politely declined not 1, not 2 but 14 requests for a blow job and a gentle tap of his balls and hastily removed myself from the replica Spanish galleon we had previously played an explosively game of strip Jenga in. Moral of the story is, if a guru tells you he once broke one of Princess Diana's arms in an epic dance off challenge, he's more than likely talking out of his arse.
    Until next time, up yours mate.
    mikus-fikuson October 15, 2016   Link
  • 0
    General Commentgreat song!!!!! loved it in slience of the lambs!!!! even though i don't have a meaning for the song maybe there is no meaning for it??? ohh well....it a great song!
    insomniacon September 17, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe way they used "Goodbye Horses" in "Silence of the Lambs" was Great! I get the creeps every time I hear it.
    Tyler2004durdenon February 09, 2005   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain