"Stars Die" as written by and Steven John Wilson....
The moon shook and curled up like gentle fire
The ocean glazed and melted wire
Voices buzzed in spiral eyes
Stars dived in blinding skies

Stars die, blinding skies

Tree cracked and mountain cried
Bridges broke, window sighed
Cells grew up and rivers burst
Sound obscured and sense reversed

Stars die, blinding skies

Hello Neil and Buzz,
I am talking to you by telephone from the Oval Room at the White House
and this certainly has to be the most historic telephone call ever made
I just can't tell you how proud we all are of what you have done
For every American this has to be the proudest day of our lives
Because of what you have done the heavens have become a part of man's world
and as you talk to us from the sea of tranquility
it inspires us to redouble our efforts
to bring peace and tranquility to earth

Idle mind and severed soul
Silent nerves and begging bowl
Shallow haze to blast a way
Hyper sleep to end the day


Lyrics submitted by Ministry, edited by Fanta-l

"Stars Die" as written by Steven Wilson

Lyrics © EMI Music Publishing, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group

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Stars Die song meanings
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  • +2
    General CommentI have a line from this song tattooed around my wrist I love it that much. Every single time I hear this song I am overwhelmed by a deep, beautiful sense of melancholia and reminded of ultimately how insignificant we are individually. Everything must come to an end eventually... there is little point of being afraid of death for it will come for us all and envelope us in layers of sleep and darkness.


    The sample of Nixon talking is as follows if anyone is interested. I find it quite haunting given the troubles that have followed since 1969.

    "Hello Neil and Buzz, I am talking to you by telephone from the Oval Room at the White House, and this certainly has to be the most historic telephone call ever made from the White House.

    I just can’t tell you how proud we all are of what you have done. For every American this has to be the proudest day of our lives, [ ----- and for people all over the world I am sure that they, too, join with Americans in recognizing what an immense feat this is.-----]

    Because of what you have done the heavens have become a part of man’s world, and as you talk to us from the Sea of Tranquility, it inspires us to redouble our efforts to bring peace and tranquility to earth."
    kiiabbyon April 29, 2009   Link
  • +1
    General Commentthese lyrics are so trippy and poetic. I'm not sure if there is a deeper meaning to what is already evident.
    GreenGoodnesson April 13, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentHey, you never know. It could be about humanity self-destructing. Stars=humans? I dunno.
    Albert_fo_shizzleon October 28, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentJust the impermanence of everything. If even something as seemingly eternal as a star must die, then nothing is forever.
    JohnDiFoolon January 10, 2007   Link
  • +1
    General Commentyes it sounds like thats right. I think the song is about when the end comes. its such a peaceful song. Realizing that nothing lasts forever, and the sertanty that you will die someday. You die, Stars Die, eventually everything and everyones time will come.
    [Service to busy]on August 01, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI have the remaster CD of The Sky Moves Sideways (And the Moonloop EP), and on this track near the end there seems to be a recording of the then-current president addressing the first American astro-nauts who landed on the moon.
    Unsoundon June 14, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentWow, great interpretation. If stars die, then nothing is forever. Beautiful.
    glorifiedg79on June 21, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthis reminds me of a girl i know....
    metrophishkidon March 08, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentSteven Wilson and Porcupine Tree are heavily influenced by the English Progressive Rock bands of the 60's and 70's. Believe it or not, The Moody Blues were considered progressive rock (to some degree, anyway). It should be pointed out that the Mellotron (an organ style instrument incorporating playback orchestral tape loops) was a principal instrument of the Moody Blues. Many rock bands caught on, but the Mellotron was a standard instrument and "sound" of all English Progressive Rock bands at the time (Genesis, Pink Floyd, Strawbs, Gentle Giant, Yes, ELP; just to mention a few.) Porcupine Tree is no different. That instrument is a staple of their sound; yes, they have a Mellotron.
    "Stars Die" is a beautifully influenced song by the Moody Blues. All you have to do is play this song to someone who grew up in the 60's/70's and watch the smile come over their faces.
    The Moody Blues never claimed to have the answer to the worlds problems (ie; man and his abuse of his environment), although many of their song lyrics took quite a stab at it. They eventually clarified in one famous song however, "I'm just a singer in a rock-n-roll band". Many of their songs talked about space and our planet, and that at least in one particular album, "To Our Children's Children's Children."
    Nevertheless, "Stars Die" could have been a modern Moody Blues song. Regardless of how you interpret it's lyrics, "Stars Die" stands as one of Porcupine Tree's most beautifully melancholy (Moody Blues) songs. My personal interpretation of this song is that Man makes his plans, but there's only one thing that will last forever... and His Love is eternal.
    Moody Blues' "Higher and Higher" lyrics: "Man, with his flaming fire, has conquered the wayward breezes. Climbing to tranquility far above the cloud conceiving the heaven clear of misty shroud" will spawn you to check out other lyrics from The Moody Blues; songs like: Beyond, Out and In, Gypsy, Watching and Waiting - all these songs are from "To Our Children's Children's Children" Album (check out the full album graphics - interesting de-evolution statement.)
    Another strong note of influence to this song is found in "The fountain of Salmacis", by Genesis from their Nursery Cryme album. The opening melody of this song and the chorus to "Stars Die" are quite similar... check that out. BTW: Pink Floyd, another influence in Porcupine Tree's sound, was considered "Space Rock" in their infancy.

    The one thing I have really learned to appreciate about Porcupine Tree is Steven Wilson's purity to (and integrity of) English Progressive Rock. He presents it with a fresh contemporary zeal. In a lot of ways, it's better than the progressive music of the era it reflects.
    From someone (me) who loved English Progressive Rock in the 70's, it's amazing to find someone carrying the torch into the new millennium.
    Kruzeron March 19, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General Comment"Silent nerves and begging bowl"

    no doubt in my mind that this is heavily influenced by drugs
    dhgrossman92on August 10, 2010   Link

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