Every building same height
Every street a straight line
Team colors, yellow and blue

Cheerlead single-file
Perfect smiles, unaffected
And you won't forget
Our colors blue

No, you won't forget it

Twenty miles westward
Home of the Redbirds
Team colors crimson, blue

Open up your purses
For the boys who reimburse us
With a goal-line stand
On fourth and two

And that goal-line stand, ha!

Summer's dry and fallow
Reservoirs are shallow
Spillways unexposed

It's never been inspected
When the government's elected
That the fields
Will turn to yellow, too (oooh)

Now the fields will turn...


Lyrics submitted by summerbabe, edited by embassyrow

Feed Them to the 5 Lions (Linden) song meanings
Add your thoughts

11 Comments

sort form View by:
  • +2
    General CommentLinden CA is a small, insulated farming town about 20 miles east of Stockton CA, with one high school. Contrasted with Stockton, which is a larger diverse urban city, Linden is still very country and very white, with kids working on farms during the summer and football is a VERY big deal, like in other more rural areas across the country. Their mascot is, of course, the Linden Lions.
    To me, this song is about that small town attitude towards high school football, that it is SO important to the community. As s7ugg1e said, it is about people not paying attention to the important things, or maybe even being able to ignore the fact that your small town is dying, and hide behind the pride of your local football team.
    stickie pantson March 31, 2007   Link
  • +1
    General Commentit's not a reference to gambling it's a reference to the stakes people in small communities put into football. Whether it be by way of overall support, or that of boosters (open up your purses for the boys who reimburse us). Football is a way of life in the these types of towns, and I don't think it really matters what teams the song is even referring to, as they're probably just generic for the purpose of the song. And I think stickie pants is right about the small town dying.
    spoonman7on June 21, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General Comment"Two colors, yellow and blue"... actual lyric is "Team colors, yellow and blue". This is also the case for the lyric "Team colors crimson, blue".
    isotope23on March 08, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentFor me this has always been the easiest Pavement song to understand, with the usual Pavement "values":

    People don't pay attention to the things they should.
    s7rugg1eon March 12, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think all the members of Pavement are sports fans to some degree or another, so it's not surprising that they would write a song referencing football.
    step behindon July 25, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI love the references to gambling. Gambling on high school football... decadence American style at its best.
    ratanxon December 16, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIs it not just called 'Lions (Linden)'?
    TheSighon June 04, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI heard Steve Malkamus say that this song is about growing up in the Central Valley of California. As others have mentioned Linden is a small town outside Stockton where he grew up.

    Water and football are both a big deal to the Central Valley which is one of the biggest agricultural regions in the world but is also basically desert without their extensive system of reservoirs and channels. I think that explains the reference to reservoirs and spillways and the fields turning yellow.
    fanteon March 07, 2012   Link
  • -1
    General CommentNo idea what it means to me. Maybe it's about St. Louis? It's a great song either way.
    rizzenon May 28, 2002   Link
  • -1
    General CommentOh no .. it's about Kentucky and Louisville. Why would they write a song about a college football game?
    Because they are(were) Pavement and they can!
    rizzenon May 28, 2002   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain