"Arabian Knights" as written by Eddie Amin, Kamen Thomas and Russell Edward Bell....
The jewel, the prize
Looking into your eyes
Cool pools drown your mind
What else will you find

I heard a rumour - it was just a rumour
I heard a rumour - what have you done to her
Myriad lights - they said I'd be impressed
Arabian Knights - at your primitive best

A tourist oasis - reflects in seedy sunshades
A monstrous oil tanker
Its wound bleeding in seas

I heard a rumour - what have you done to her
I heard a rumour - what have you done to her

Veiled behind screens
Kept as your baby machine
Whilst you conquer more orifices
Of boys, goats and things
Ripped out sheeps' eyes - no forks or knives

Myriad lights - they said I'd be impressed
Arabian Knights - at your primitive best


Lyrics submitted by Kaitou

"Arabian Knights" as written by Severin Clarke

Lyrics © BMG RIGHTS MANAGEMENT US, LLC, DOMINO PUBLISHING COMPANY

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Arabian Knights song meanings
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13 Comments

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  • +6
    General CommentIt's a powerful song, a gut reaction to some of the horror stories we should by now all be familiar with about the abuse of women in the Middle East. Unfortunately, it only adds to a one-sided view of that culture, which has helped to justify recent wars. Terrible abuse of women does occur there - and it happens within wester cultures too. It might surprise some people, but most Arab women are not longing to be westernised.
    jimqukon November 15, 2008   Link
  • +4
    General Comment"lash out at arab culture(?)" please save the histrionics. no culture is sacred or immune to criticism. the song ARABIAN NIGHTS is intelligent and thoughtful in it's critique and based on historical fact. white slavery, repression and deviant sex, oil spills, misogyny, all especially visible in arab culture past and present. siouxsie can trash ANY culture with accuracy and style, and she does. siouxsie "lashes out" at western culture in almost every song she writes, and we should be thankful, she is one of the few doing it intelligently. should poor little defenseless arab culture be protected from big bad souixsie? dry your tears, i think arab culture can survive the occasional criticism. in fact lack of criticism means no possibiltiy of change or growth. siouxsie's ARABIAN NIGHTS represents some of the best criticism there is, insightful, compelling, and most important of all, it is great music.
    skinneron September 20, 2006   Link
  • +3
    General CommentI don't see this as Siouxsie lashing out against Arab culture in general, but at the way women in the Arab world are sometimes treated. Siouxsie has never struck me as a racist person, but I could see how an assertive and intelligent Western woman like Siouxsie would be disgusted and upset by the abuses many women in Arabic countries suffer. However, I am not sure that this is all this song is really about in a thematic sense. SatB songs tend to have more complex meanings than what appears on the surface. "Hong Kong Garden" has been called a racist song, for example, but the truth is that it is exactly the opposite.
    katherowenon March 27, 2005   Link
  • +3
    General CommentFirst read their upside down cd booklet. This song was written after their trip to the middle east. She found out that is a muslim women was caught being promiscuous they would be stone to death. Then she heard that a brother basically kidnapped his sister and smuggled her out of the country to keep her alive. He was a knight.
    vestasmeon January 16, 2008   Link
  • +1
    General CommentLook Skinner, WHAT makes you think that I view this song and/or Siouxsie in a negative light?!? ARABIAN KNIGHTS clearly expresses a VERY negative view of arab culture. DO NOT assume that I am scorning her for being politically incorrect! I was curious as to what inspired her to write this song. Was she speaking from her own personal experiences or from a political perspective. Moreover, had she ever been to an Arab country.
    Sozlukon November 23, 2006   Link
  • +1
    My InterpretationThis song is about female circumcision that is practised in Arabic countries. She doesn't hate Arabs, don't jump to conclusions. She is just against the practise. Re read the lyrics. "baby machine." Sound familiar?
    eburneancrowon April 02, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI believe she's entitled to her subjective insights/criticisms/impressions, something that a great artist like her does in every song. The question of "who says what to whom", which quite often decides whether a statement/text is racist/offensive doesn't really apply to a critical lyricist like siouxie. I lament the absence of such great culturally-subversive art like hers today! Besides, the truly artistic and beautiful ambiguity of her lyrics keep them above petty racism. (for the record, I'm an Arab)
    theunthinkeron February 05, 2012   Link
  • +1
    Song MeaningSIOUXSIE: "It’s nothing to do with a ‘feminist’ thing, it’s like a humane thing. Like how the Muslim women cope, I don’t know. The way women are treated in some religions, if it was a race being treated like that and not a sex, there would be uproar about it. I still haven’t overcome being a girl yet, as far as other people see me, and that’s very important. I think it’s happened a bit, but not enough." Source: NME 15/08/81
    JJKelsallon December 01, 2012   Link
  • 0
    General Commentwhat inspired siouxsie to lash out at arab culture?
    Sozlukon December 28, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentLook Skinner, WHAT makes you think that I view this song and/or Siouxsie in a negative light?!? ARABIAN KNIGHTS clearly expresses a VERY negative view of arab culture. DO NOT assume that I am scorning her for being politically incorrect! I was curious as to what inspired her to write this song. Was she speaking from her own personal experiences or from a political perspective. Moreover, had she ever been to an Arab country.
    Sozlukon November 23, 2006   Link

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